Banana Blueberry Smoothie Recipe

For Christmas this year I received a Ninja blender and I think I am in love. One of the features I really enjoy is the individual blending cups. The idea is you can make a serving size drink in a neat little cup (that you can also serve your drink in - BONUS) instead of having to get the whole blender out if you are making a smoothie for one.

I've been playing around with the proportions a bit and finally stumbled on my favorite blend of ingredients that are almost always readily available in our kitchen. It's a tasty little afternoon pick-me-up or a healthy alternative to dessert. Even the kids will like this one.


Ingredients


  • 1 banana
  • 1 c frozen blueberries
  • 1 c skim milk
  • 1 T agave necktar
  • 2 T wheat germ
  • 2 ice cubes

Peel the banana, break it into pieces and add it to the bottom of your individual blending cup.









Add 1 cup of frozen blueberries.










Add 1 cup of skim milk.










Add 1 tablespoon of agave nectar.










Add 2 tablespoons of wheat germ.










Add 2 ice cubes.










Screw the mixing blade onto the cup. Place the cup on the blender. Turn on the power.









Press the single serving button and blend for about 10 seconds.










Remove the cup from the blender. Remove the mixing blade. Insert a straw and enjoy!









Decoupage Key Hooks

The reality in our home right now is that in less than two months we will have a third licensed driver in the house and a third car in the driveway. Aagh... I know it's going to be okay, but I am having a difficult time with this transition. It seems like yesterday when my baby was still, well, a baby.

I decided that I would try to embrace this change with a project. More cars means more keys, so I am going to try to be organized with some key hooks. We have an area in our kitchen where phones, bills, checkbooks and what not all collect, so it seemed that would be a perfect place for the keys, too.

Materials


  • 4 wood plaques
  • white paint (acrylic or latex)
  • 1 or 2 paint brushes
  • 1 piece of scrapbook paper
  • paper cutter, paper punches or die cut machine
  • Mod Podge
  • decoupage gloss sealer (optional)
  • drill
  • 4 cup hooks
  • 4 small sawtooth hangers
  • hammer
  • needle nosed pliers (optional)
  • poster tack (optional)
  • 4 small nails

Directions


Begin with your four plaques. You can get these at your local craft or hobby store. I chose square ones, but they come in a variety of shapes.








Paint each plaque. Let the paint dry. If you need to, apply a second coat of paint.









Cut out the paper shapes you would like to apply on your plaques. I used my Silhouette Cameo Starter Kit Bundle Cutter but you can use another type of die cut machine or even shape punches or scissors.

If you use a Silhouette, these shapes are from a set is called "basic icons 2" and you can purchase it on the Silhouette America web site.




Now it's time to decoupage.

Place one of your die cuts on a painted plaque and position it the way you like. Use a paintbrush to apply a generous coat of Mod Podge over the top of your paper shape.

If you are unfamiliar with Mod Podge, it's like a really liquidy glue that dries clear. It will soak into your paper and adhere it to the wooden surface.




Use the Mod Podge to attach your die cuts to each plaque. Let the Mod Podge dry.









I like to spray on a coat of decoupage glass sealer to make my projects more durable, but it's your preference. Let the sealer dry.

Mark where you will be placing the hooks on each plaque. I chose to put mine in the center.








Drill holes where the hooks will be inserted. You don't have to drill all the way through the wood, just enough to get the hooks started.

Don't screw in the hooks quite yet.






On the back of each plaque you will need to attach the sawtooth hangers. Make sure they are positioned in the same location on each plaque.

Protect your fingers. You may want to use a needle nosed pliers to hold the tiny nails while you hammer.





Once the hangers are on, turn the plaques over and attach the cup hooks.









Your key hooks are ready to hang on the wall.

Since the keys will be placed on the hooks and taken off again, I stuck a little ball of poster tack on the back of each plaque so it wouldn't be jostled around.





Finally, add your keys for some pretty and practical home organization.



Fun Find Friday

'Keep Calm and Knit On!' by minniesretro77


Needle Felted Owl Ornament - Knitting Rainbow - scratchcraft
Needle Felted Owl Ornam...
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knit me somethin' ring - sterling silver knitting ring, gift for knitter, knitting jewelry, for the love of knitting - wearthou
knit me somethin' r...
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Pink Knitting Project Bag - drawstring yarn bag - Kelly Connor Designs - KellyConnorDesigns
Pink Knitting Project B...
$17.27
Knitting Thank You Tags for Knitters and Knitting Shops - SweetandSassyCards
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Knitting necklace - sterling silver knitting charm . ball of yarn and knitting needles . i love knitting - sevgicharms
Knitting necklace - ste...
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Itty Bitty Birdies (Plain and Fancy) - PDF Knitting Pattern Set - yarnmiracle
Itty Bitty Birdies (Pla...
$5.00
Candy Floss Knitting Needles - Matryoshka - sailonbaby
Candy Floss Knitting Ne...
$30.00
knitting sheep note cards, whimsical gift for knitters or fiber lovers - needleclicksEtc
knitting sheep note car...
$10.00
Knitting Needle Roll, Knitting Needle Organizer, Knitting Needle Case, Red Rose by Knotted Nest on Etsy - knottednest
Knitting Needle Roll, K...
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Knitting Stamp. Custom Address Rubber Stamp, Hand Knitted with love, Thank You Stamp, Business Logo, Yarn Stamp (22362) - myrubberstamp
Knitting Stamp. Custom ...
$18.00
Knitting Ear studs - Green knit earrings - maxsworld
Knitting Ear studs - Gr...
$10.00
More Knitting Buttons - FREE SHIPPING - pepsy
More Knitting Buttons -...
$6.00
Antique Silver Tone Vintage Knitting Queen Heart And Crown Charms 25x17mm - 10Pcs - DF20589 - diycharm
Antique Silver Tone Vin...
$2.30
Daffodil Knitting Needles Handmade on premium bamboo-- Polymer-- Size 0 - 15 - DotDotSmile
Daffodil Knitting Needl...
$11.00
Knitting Bag - Cotton Canvas Tote Bag - CRAFT Bag - lcdezines
Knitting Bag - Cotton C...
$12.00
Knitting Pattern iPhone 4, iPhone 4 case, iPhone 4S case, iPhone cover, iPhone hard case - caseOrama
Knitting Pattern iPhone...
$16.95



Basic Knit Cable

Knitting is one of my favorite pastimes. In fact, if I am not blogging, working, or spending time with my family, chances are I'm knitting. Once you get the hang of it, knitting is a very rhythmic and repetitive form of creative meditation. (I just came up with that myself - creative meditation. It sounds pretty Zen!) The thing that continually amazes me about knitting is how many different patterns can be created with only two stitches, knit and purl.

The first thing many people think of when they think about knitting is a traditional cabled sweater. The cabling patterns in a classic sweater can almost look like they are woven or braided together. Just like all knitting patterns are various combinations of knit and purl stitches, all cabling patterns are variations of a front cable or a back cable.

Let me show you how cabling works. If you already know how to knit and purl, cabling may be less difficult than you think. All you need is a set of knitting needles, a cabling hook and some yarn.

Cabling can be done over just about any number of stitches, but I am going to show you a six stitch cable. Also, cabling is often worked between two sections of reverse stockinette stitch (that's where the stitches are purled on the front and knit on the back.) For this example I worked four stitches of reverse stockinette on either side of my cable.

Cast on 14 stitches

Front Cable


The first three rows are pretty simple.

Row 1: (wrong side) K4, P6, K4
Row 2: P4, K6, P4
Row 3: K4, P6, K4





All the tricky stuff happens in Row 4.

Row 4: P4, slip 3 sts onto the short side of your cabling hook. Just let the cabling hook rest on the front of your work,








K3 from your knitting needle then K3 from the long side of your cabling hook,









Finally, P4.









Row 5: K4, P6, K4
Row 6: P4, K6, P4
Row 7: K4, P6, K4
Row 8: P4, K6, P4







Now you just repeat those 8 rows.

Row 1: K4, P6, K4
Row 2: P4, K6, P4
Row 3: K4, P6, K4







Row 4: P4, slip 3 sts onto the short side of your cabling hook. Just let the cabling hook rest on the front of your work,








K3 from your knitting needle then K3 from the long side of your cabling hook,









Finally, P4.









Row 5: K4, P6, K4
Row 6: P4, K6, P4
Row 7: K4, P6, K4
Row 8: P4, K6, P4


Keep repeating Row 1-8.




Back Cable

The back cable is worked exactly like the front cable except this time in Row 4 you hold the cabling needle behind your work instead of in the front. Watch.

Row 1: K4, P6, K4
Row 2: P4, K6, P4
Row 3: K4, P6, K4

Row 4: P4, slip 3 sts onto the short side of your cabling hook.









Now flip the cabling hook so it is behind your work.









Let the cabling hook rest behind your work, K3 from your knitting needle then K3 from the long side of your cabling hook,








Finally, P4.









Row 5: K4, P6, K4
Row 6: P4, K6, P4
Row 7: K4, P6, K4
Row 8: P4, K6, P4

Notice that now the cabling goes to the right.




Repeat Rows 1-8.

Once you master basic cabling the possibilities are endless.