Showing posts with label Endless Leather. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Endless Leather. Show all posts

Crochet Pattern: Pink Sands Pocket Purse

Free Crochet Pattern: Pink Sands Pocket Purse to carry just the essentials (wallet, keys, phone) when you are on the go.If you've been following along on the blog, you know that I have happily downsized my purse. It used to be called my "Big Bag of Everything" but these days I am quite pleased that it has become my "Little Bag of Necessities".

About a month ago I shared a knitting pattern for my Lifeline Pocket Purse. Today I have a crochet pattern for another micro purse. It's approximately 5 inches wide x 7 ½ inches deep and perfect for those days you want to travel light.

Many thanks to Endless Leather for providing the fantastic silk cord and jewelry findings to complete this purse.

Materials

Abbreviations 

ch - chain
sc - single crochet

Directions


This bag is worked from the bottom up, in a continuous spiral with the right side facing so there is no need to turn the piece over as you work or join the last stitch of the round to the first with a slip stitch.

Bag

Ch 30

Rnd 1: 3 sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 27 ch, 2 sc in next ch, sc in the bottom of next 27 ch. (59 sc)

Rnd 2: [sc in next sc, sc in the stich below the next sc] repeat these two stitches until the piece measures 7 ½ inches from the beginning ch.

Use a ruler to find the center stitch of the bag. The center stitch should be a sc (NOT a sc in the stitch below the next sc). continue working in the pattern to 5 sts before the center mark. Your last stitch should be a sc in the stitch below the next sc.


Closure Flap

This section is worked in rows.

Row 1: [sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc] 5 times, ch 1, turn.

Repeat Row 1 until the flap measures 2 inches.

Row 2 (buttonhole row): sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc, sc in next sc, ch 4, skip 4 sts, sc in the stitch below the next sc, sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc, ch 1, turn.

Row 3: sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc, sc in next sc, 1 sc in each of the next 4 ch, sc in the stitch below the next sc, sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc.

Repeat Row 1 until the flap measures 1 inch from the button hole omitting the last ch 1 of the final row. Fasten off.

Use a needle and thread to attach a button.

Assembling the Strap

Attach the circle clasps to either side of the bag.
Cut the silk cord to the desired strap length minus ¾-inch. (If you plan to carry your purse over one shoulder, you will need 28-36 inches of cord. For a cross-body strap, plan on using 48-54 inches of cord. As shown, the silk cord was cut to 28 inches.) Be careful so the cord does not fray after it's cut.

Place a generous dot of G-S Hypo Cement into one end cup. You can even add a little glue around the tip of the silk cord.

Tip: If you don't use enough glue, the cord will slide out of the end cup the first time you use your purse.
Insert one end of the cord into the end cup. It is helpful to slightly twist the cord in the direction that it tightens as you push it into the end cup.

It's ok if some glue oozes out. Simply use a damp cloth to clean the outside of the end cup and the silk cord before the glue starts to dry.
Attach the second end cup to the other end of the cord in the same way.

LET THE GLUE DRY COMPLETELY FOR 24 HOURS.

Use pliers to open the jump rings and attach them to the looped sides of the end cups.

Open the circle clasps and slide them through the jump rings.
Fill your bag with a small wallet, phone and maybe some lip gloss and you are ready to go.

Free Crochet Pattern: Pink Sands Pocket Purse to carry just the essentials (wallet, keys, phone) when you are on the go.

A printable version of the Pink Sands Pocket Purse Pattern is available in my pattern shop. Happy crocheting!




Tutorial: Cork Herringbone Stitch Bracelet

DIY a simply elegant summer bracelet using cork cord, metallic embroidery floss and a herringbone stitch.Today I have a bracelet tutorial that is similar to my Whip Stitched Cork Wrap Bracelet. This one is a single wrap bracelet that uses a slightly more intricate embroidery stitch known as the herringbone stitch.

Again, I used a shiny, metallic embroidery floss to highlight the silver flecks in the cork cord, but you could use regular floss if you prefer.

Many thanks to Endless Leather for providing the cork cord for this tutorial.

Materials




Tools




Directions


My bracelet is going to be 8 inches around so I cut my cork cord 7 1/2 inches long and the clasp adds 1/2 inch to the finished length.

If you have very narrow or very wide wrists you may need to adjust the length of the cork cord. Just make sure the cord is cut to a 1/4 inch increment. You can slide the clasps onto the end of the cord and try on the bracelet before you go any further.

First, you are going to use a pen to draw to rows of marks that are 1/4 inch apart on the back side of the cork cord.
See how the marks make a sort of grid pattern.



Next use an awl or a large, sharp needle to poke through the cork cord at each mark.

I recommend protecting your work surface with a small mat.
It takes a little muscle to poke through the cork. (Oops... you may notice that I bent my needle.)

Be careful not to poke your hand while you are poking holes. Ouch!
Embroidery Stitch Chart: Herringbone Stitch Next, thread a length of embroidery floss (all of the strands) onto a needle.

It's easier to show you the stitch with a diagram than a photo, so here it goes.

The solid lines show what the stitching on the front of your bracelet will look like.

The dotted lines show what the stitching on the back of your bracelet will look like.

Starting at one end of the cork cord, bring your floss up (from back to front) through hole A leaving about a 3 inch tail.

Continue along going down through hole B, up through C, down through D, up through E and so on.
As I said, the front of the bracelet has the herringbone stitch.

The back looks like two dashed lines.

Trim the end of your floss to about a 3 inch length.
When your stitching is complete, apply a bit of G-S- Hypo Cement into each clasp.

When you slide the cork into the clasps, make sure one of the magnets is face up and the other is face down or the magnets will not close properly when you are wearing your bracelet.
Tightly fold the embroidery floss over the end of the cord and slide the cord into the clasp. Repeat on the other end of the bracelet.
Now the hard part.

LET THE GLUE DRY COMPLETELY FOR 24 HOURS.

After the glue is dry and the clasps are completely secured to the cork cord, use a sharp pair of scissors to trim the ends of the floss being careful not to cut through your stitching.

Your bracelet is ready to wear for some casual summer fun!

DIY a simply elegant summer bracelet using cork cord, metallic embroidery floss and a herringbone stitch.





Tutorial: Whip Stitch Cork Wrap Bracelet

Jewelry Making DIY Tutorial: Learn how to craft a casual wrap bracelet with cork cord and metallic embroidery floss.If you enjoyed my Laced Hearts Cork Bracelet you are going to love this tutorial! I'm using the same cork cord, but this time I'm pairing it with metallic embroidery floss to create a lightweigt wrap bracelet that will brighten up your casual wear.

Many thanks to Endless Leather for providing the cork cord and jewelry findings for this tutorial.

Materials




Tools




Directions


Cut a 24 inch (for narrow wrists) to 30 inch (for larger wrists) length of the cork cord. You would rather have the cord too long at this point.

Before we go any further, let's make sure that this is the right length for your wrist.
Slide the toggles onto either end of the cord and wrap the bracelet three times around your wrist. If the bracelet is too long, you can trim the cork cord shorter. Just make sure that the final cork length is a multiple of 1/4 inch.

Remove the toggles and set aside.
Use a pen to mark every 1/4 inch down the center of the back of the cork.
This next part takes a little patience and muscle.

Punch a 1/16th inch hole on each mark.
Thread your embroidery floss onto a needle. Pull the floss through the first hole from back to front leaving a tail of about 3-4 inches.
Now it's time to whip stitch. Pull the floss up, from back to front, through the next hole and then the next and then the next, pulling the floss snugly between each stitch.
Continue down the length of the cord.

Trim the floss to 3-4 inches after the last stitch.
Now you'll whip stitch up the other side of the cork with a second piece of floss.

Pull the floss up through the same hole you began with before.
Pull the floss up, from back to front, through the next hole and then the next and then the next, pulling the floss snugly between each stitch, as before. After the last stitch, trim the floss to 3-4 inches.
Next, apply a generous amount of G-S Hypo Cement inside each of the toggles.
Fold the tails of the floss over the end of the cork cord and slide the toggle into place.

Secure the other toggle in the same way.

LET THE GLUE DRY COMPLETELY FOR 24 HOURS.
Use a sharp pair of scissors to trim the excess floss being careful not to cut through any stitches.
Jewelry Making DIY Tutorial: Learn how to craft a casual wrap bracelet with cork cord and metallic embroidery floss. That's a wrap!
Enjoy wearing your new wrap bracelet with jeans, shorts, or just about anything.

Jewelry Making DIY Tutorial: Learn how to craft a casual wrap bracelet with cork cord and metallic embroidery floss.





Knitting Pattern: Lifeline Pocket Purse

Free Knitting Pattern: Lifeline Pocket Purse to carry just the essentials (phone, wallet, keys) when you are on the go.I'm a mom and for 17 years my family called my purse the "Big Bag of Everything". I was like Mary Poppins. If you needed a tissue, it was in my purse. Need a pen? In my purse. Bandage, ibuprofen, reusable shopping bag, nail file, eye drops, lip balm. They were all in my purse and there was still ample room to hold everyone else's stuff, too.

Now that the nest is empty, I can finally downsize my "Big Bag of Everything" to a much more convenient "Little Bag of Necessities". It is so nice to carry just what I need instead of what the whole world needs.

With that in mind I designed this pattern to hold just the basics when you are on the go. It's approximately 4 3/8 inches wide x 6 ½ inches deep.

Many thanks to Endless Leather for providing the fantastic silk cord and jewelry findings to complete this purse. Also, thanks to my Facebook followers for helping me name this pattern.

Materials


Abbreviations

CO - cast on
k - knit
p - purl
RS - right side
WS - wrong side
ssk - slip two stitches individually knitwise, then knit the two stitches together through the back loops
k2tog - knit 2 stitches together

Shingle Stitch Chart


Shingle Stitch Knitting Chart

Directions


Bag

The bag is worked in the round with the right side facing.

CO 80 across 4 dpns or short circular needles leaving a long (approx. 24 inch) tail.

Work the Shingle Stitch in rounds, following the chart, until the piece measures 6 ½ inches from the cast on edge, ending after either Rnd 6 or Rnd 12.

Bind off 40 sts.

Flap

The flap of the purse is worked flat over 30 rows following the stitch chart. Make sure to read your work as you decrease the sides of the flap to maintain the pattern.

Rows 1-4: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (40 sts)
Row 5: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (38 sts)
Rows 6-9: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (38 sts)
Row 10: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (36 sts)
Rows 11-13: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (36 sts)
Row 14: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (34 sts)
Rows 15-17: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (34 sts)
Row 18 (Button Hole Row): Ssk, work pattern as charted for 13 sts, bind off 4 sts, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (14 sts, buttonhole gap, 14 sts)
Row 19: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern for 14 sts, co 4 sts, continue maintaining the charted stitch pattern for 14 sts. (32 sts)
Row 20: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (32 sts)
Row 21: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (30 sts)
Rows 22-23: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (30 sts)
Row 24: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (28 sts)
Row 25: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (28 sts)
Row 26: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (26 sts)
Row 27: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (26 sts)
Rows 28-30: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (Rnd 28: 24 sts, Rnd 29: 22 sts, Rnd 30: 20 sts)

Bind off.

Join the bottom of the cast on edge with the yarn tail using a tapestry needle.
Position the button and stitch it on using a needle and thread.
Assembling the Strap


Attach the circle clasps to either side of the bag about 6 rows down from the bound off edge.
Cut the silk cord to the desired strap length minus ¾-inch. (If you plan to carry your purse over one shoulder, you will need 28-36 inches of cord. For a cross-body strap, plan on using 48-54 inches of cord. As shown, the silk cord was cut to 28 inches.) Be careful so the cord does not fray after it's cut.

Place a generous dot of G-S Hypo Cement into one end cup. You can even add a little glue around the tip of the silk cord.

Tip: If you don't use enough glue, the cord will slide out of the end cup the first time you use your purse.
Insert one end of the cord into the end cup. It is helpful to slightly twist the cord in the direction that it tightens as you push it into the end cup.

It's ok if some glue oozes out. Simply use a damp cloth to clean the outside of the end cup and the silk cord before the glue starts to dry.
Attach the second end cup to the other end of the cord in the same way.

LET THE GLUE DRY COMPLETELY FOR 24 HOURS.

Use pliers to open the jump rings and attach them to the looped sides of the end cups.
Open the circle clasps and slide them through the jump rings.
Fill your bag with a small wallet, phone and maybe some lip gloss and you are ready to go.

Free Knitting Pattern: Lifeline Pocket Purse to carry just the essentials (phone, wallet, keys) when you are on the go.

A printable version of my Lifeline Pocket Purse Pattern is available in my pattern shop. Happy Knitting!