Showing posts with label G-S Hypo Cement. Show all posts
Showing posts with label G-S Hypo Cement. Show all posts

Craft Tutorial: Irish Euro Shamrock Pendant

Transform a foreign coin and shamrock into a keepsake necklace

Ireland is a lovely country. We visited back in 2005 and had a delightful time. The people are friendly, the countryside is green (a stark contrast to life here in the desert), the food was savory, there are plenty of castles and historical attractions, and the woodlands are magical.

After our trip, I had a couple Euros left in my pocket. I didn't really think about them much until this year. Somehow, even though we live in the middle of the Sonoran Desert, I have a large patch of shamrocks that have taken over one of my flower beds. It seemed to me that my Irish Euros would be the perfect background for a shamrock pendant.

Materials




Directions


The first step is to collect and press some small shamrocks. If you are not lucky enough to have a shamrock patch, many nurseries carry indoor shamrock plants in the spring.

The pressing and drying process can take anywhere from a few days to a couple weeks.
Once your shamrocks are ready, tear off a piece of packing tape that is long enoug to wrap around the edge of your coin about 1 1/2 times.

Cut a strip of tape about 1/2 inch wide.
Wrap the tape tightly around the coin. You can fold down a small edge of the tape so it is easier to remove later.
Make sure to press the tape firmly down around the edge of the coin.

The tape makes a sort of bezel that can be filled with resin.
Tiny dried shamrocks are very delicate. Tap a cotton swab on your tongue then use the swab to lift your shamrock.
Place the shamrock onto the center of the coin.
Use a toothpick to slide the shamrock into position if necessary.

Make sure your coins are on a protected work surface before you begin using the resin. I like using parchment paper to cover my surface, although a plastic plate will also work.
Mix the resin in a disposable cup according to the package directions. Stir the resin gently to minimize the formation of bubbles.

Resin is very sticky, messy and hard to clean up so again, make sure your work surface is protected.
Carefully pour the resin onto your tape-wrapped coins.
The resin should be approximately the same thickness as the coin.
After about 20-40 minutes you may see that your shamrock has floated to the surface of the resin. If this happens, carefully use a toothpick to gently submerge the shamrock halfway between the coin and the resin surface.
Now the hard part. Do not move or touch your resin covered coins for 24 hours. The shiny resin surface is irresistible but keep your hands off.

After 24 hours, remove the tape from the coin.
You will notice that the resin is very smooth across the center of the coin, but there is a ridge along the edge.

Use a scissors (at about a 45° angle to the resin) to trim away the excess resin.

Don't worry if it looks a little uneven at this point.
Use a piece of very fine grit wet/dry sandpaper to smooth out the edge of the resin by holding the coin at a 45° angle to the paper and rubbing the resin on the paper.

This process takes a little time and patience, but is well worth the effort.
The coin on the left has been sanded, the coin on the right has not.

There is still a slight lip around the edge of the resin, but we’re going to call that a design element.
Once you have smoothed down the resin edges, it's time to attach the bail to the back of the coin with G-S Hypo Cement.

Again, work on a parchment covered surface.
Fill the depression of the bail with G-S Hypo Cement and wait for about 15-30 seconds. Position the coin onto the bail.

And then, the hard part, again. Do not move or touch the pendant for 24 hours while the glue cures completely.
Once the glue has dried, simply slide a chain or cord through the bail and your necklace is ready to wear.

Transform a foreign coin and shamrock into a keepsake pendant

Happy St. Patrick's Day!




Tutorial: Cork Herringbone Stitch Bracelet

DIY a simply elegant summer bracelet using cork cord, metallic embroidery floss and a herringbone stitch.Today I have a bracelet tutorial that is similar to my Whip Stitched Cork Wrap Bracelet. This one is a single wrap bracelet that uses a slightly more intricate embroidery stitch known as the herringbone stitch.

Again, I used a shiny, metallic embroidery floss to highlight the silver flecks in the cork cord, but you could use regular floss if you prefer.

Many thanks to Endless Leather for providing the cork cord for this tutorial.

Materials




Tools




Directions


My bracelet is going to be 8 inches around so I cut my cork cord 7 1/2 inches long and the clasp adds 1/2 inch to the finished length.

If you have very narrow or very wide wrists you may need to adjust the length of the cork cord. Just make sure the cord is cut to a 1/4 inch increment. You can slide the clasps onto the end of the cord and try on the bracelet before you go any further.

First, you are going to use a pen to draw to rows of marks that are 1/4 inch apart on the back side of the cork cord.
See how the marks make a sort of grid pattern.



Next use an awl or a large, sharp needle to poke through the cork cord at each mark.

I recommend protecting your work surface with a small mat.
It takes a little muscle to poke through the cork. (Oops... you may notice that I bent my needle.)

Be careful not to poke your hand while you are poking holes. Ouch!
Embroidery Stitch Chart: Herringbone Stitch Next, thread a length of embroidery floss (all of the strands) onto a needle.

It's easier to show you the stitch with a diagram than a photo, so here it goes.

The solid lines show what the stitching on the front of your bracelet will look like.

The dotted lines show what the stitching on the back of your bracelet will look like.

Starting at one end of the cork cord, bring your floss up (from back to front) through hole A leaving about a 3 inch tail.

Continue along going down through hole B, up through C, down through D, up through E and so on.
As I said, the front of the bracelet has the herringbone stitch.

The back looks like two dashed lines.

Trim the end of your floss to about a 3 inch length.
When your stitching is complete, apply a bit of G-S- Hypo Cement into each clasp.

When you slide the cork into the clasps, make sure one of the magnets is face up and the other is face down or the magnets will not close properly when you are wearing your bracelet.
Tightly fold the embroidery floss over the end of the cord and slide the cord into the clasp. Repeat on the other end of the bracelet.
Now the hard part.

LET THE GLUE DRY COMPLETELY FOR 24 HOURS.

After the glue is dry and the clasps are completely secured to the cork cord, use a sharp pair of scissors to trim the ends of the floss being careful not to cut through your stitching.

Your bracelet is ready to wear for some casual summer fun!

DIY a simply elegant summer bracelet using cork cord, metallic embroidery floss and a herringbone stitch.





Tutorial: Whip Stitch Cork Wrap Bracelet

Jewelry Making DIY Tutorial: Learn how to craft a casual wrap bracelet with cork cord and metallic embroidery floss.If you enjoyed my Laced Hearts Cork Bracelet you are going to love this tutorial! I'm using the same cork cord, but this time I'm pairing it with metallic embroidery floss to create a lightweigt wrap bracelet that will brighten up your casual wear.

Many thanks to Endless Leather for providing the cork cord and jewelry findings for this tutorial.

Materials




Tools




Directions


Cut a 24 inch (for narrow wrists) to 30 inch (for larger wrists) length of the cork cord. You would rather have the cord too long at this point.

Before we go any further, let's make sure that this is the right length for your wrist.
Slide the toggles onto either end of the cord and wrap the bracelet three times around your wrist. If the bracelet is too long, you can trim the cork cord shorter. Just make sure that the final cork length is a multiple of 1/4 inch.

Remove the toggles and set aside.
Use a pen to mark every 1/4 inch down the center of the back of the cork.
This next part takes a little patience and muscle.

Punch a 1/16th inch hole on each mark.
Thread your embroidery floss onto a needle. Pull the floss through the first hole from back to front leaving a tail of about 3-4 inches.
Now it's time to whip stitch. Pull the floss up, from back to front, through the next hole and then the next and then the next, pulling the floss snugly between each stitch.
Continue down the length of the cord.

Trim the floss to 3-4 inches after the last stitch.
Now you'll whip stitch up the other side of the cork with a second piece of floss.

Pull the floss up through the same hole you began with before.
Pull the floss up, from back to front, through the next hole and then the next and then the next, pulling the floss snugly between each stitch, as before. After the last stitch, trim the floss to 3-4 inches.
Next, apply a generous amount of G-S Hypo Cement inside each of the toggles.
Fold the tails of the floss over the end of the cork cord and slide the toggle into place.

Secure the other toggle in the same way.

LET THE GLUE DRY COMPLETELY FOR 24 HOURS.
Use a sharp pair of scissors to trim the excess floss being careful not to cut through any stitches.
Jewelry Making DIY Tutorial: Learn how to craft a casual wrap bracelet with cork cord and metallic embroidery floss. That's a wrap!
Enjoy wearing your new wrap bracelet with jeans, shorts, or just about anything.

Jewelry Making DIY Tutorial: Learn how to craft a casual wrap bracelet with cork cord and metallic embroidery floss.