Showing posts with label clothing. Show all posts
Showing posts with label clothing. Show all posts

10 Things to Love About Slow Fashion

10 Things to love about slow fashion: What I learned from mending a sweater

The Slow Fashion movement is gaining popularity around the world. Quite simply, the idea is about choosing more sustainable clothing alternatives such as eco and fair trade fashion, second hand buying, swapping and repairing existing wardrobe items.

As a crafty girl that puts a lot of time and effort into design and making, I can definitely appreciate the fact that quality is better than quantity. So, when my husband's favorite sweater was in need of some TLC, I decided to take the time to repair it instead of just chucking it in the trash.

My husband keeps this sweater in his office and it has likely been worn every work day for the last five years. Unfortuantely it had developed two problems. First, the zipper pull broke off in the laundry. Second, one of the pockets was detached and beginning to unravel.

The good news about the zipper was that my husband never actually uses it. Also, there was already a redundant set of buttons in place, just in case. This meant I was able to simply remove the zipper and restitch the facing. Easy peasy.
The pocket presented a slightly larger problem, but one that I was able to solve thanks to my knitting experience. Since the pocket was unravelling I needed to re-knit the stitches. Fortunately the yarn was not damaged. After that I used a piece of scrap yarn from my stash to graft the pocket back into place.
So, what did I learn from this slow fashion experience?

1. Slow fashion is empowering!


In just a couple hours, I was able to at least double the life expectancy of this garment. That may not seem like a big deal to some people, but I feel like I accomplished something pretty amazing.

2. Slow fashion discourages a throw away culture.


It is so easy to just throw away a cheap item knowing that you can pick up a replacement at the local big box for a few dollars. Is that the type of lifestyle we really want to embrace and model to our children?

3. Slow fashion is a way to practice creative skills.


This little project gave me a chance to flex my creative muscles. I had to figure out how to make a sturdy repair that looked nice and was functional. I was able to incorporate my engineering, knitting and sewing skills. Just look at those neat little handmade stitches!

10 Things to love about slow fashion: What I learned from mending a sweater

4. Slow fashion saves time.


This may seem counter intuitive because fixing this sweater took a couple hours. If I had thrown it away and purchased a replacement we would have driven to the mall to browse a number of different stores or spent time online searching for the perfect replacement sweater. And of course there is the time spent working to earn the money to pay for a new sweater.

5. Slow fashion saves money.


I used a seam ripper, needle, thread, knitting needles and yarn to fix this sweater. I already had all of the tools and materials in my sewing room, but even if you consider the full price for each of theses items, it would add up to less than the cost of a new sweater.

6. Slow fashion is a way to express yourself.


My repair was fairly basic, but I have seen other mends that involve patching or embroidery and they can be a beautiful way to incorporate new color and texture into an old garment.

7. Slow fashion creates less waste.


It's well known that the fashion industry creates a lot of waste in the production process. My repair minimized the need for the waste from producing a new sweater and kept the existing one out of the landfill.

8. Slow fashion shows you care.


I took the time to fix this sweater, in part because I know my husband really likes it. I hope that every time he wears it he feels the love that I put into every stitch.

9. Slow fashion makes you appreciate the importance of a job well done.


Of course I am proud of my own repair work and glad I took the time to do it right. While I was working, I also noticed the well-thought design elements from the original construction. Who ever chose to add a sturdy facing to the sweater opening was a genius. It was more expensive to manufacture the garment with this feature, but if the facing had not been there, removing or replacing the zipper would not have been an easy task.

10. Slow fashion generates quality time.


As I sat at the table making repairs, my husband sat with me and we were able to savor a cup of coffee, chat about current events and just enjoy each other's company. Definitely time well spent!

10 Things to love about slow fashion: What I learned from mending a sweater
How do you incorporate the concept of slow living into your daily routine?



Knitting Pattern: Unwind Infinity Scarf

Soft and lacy, the Unwind Infinity Scarf is a fun knitting pattern for spring.I was just looking through my posts for the month and January and realized my projects have been kind of knit-centric lately, but I have just one more pattern to share that I think you will really enjoy.

This one is perfect for spring. It's a light weight infinity scarf with an open, lacy stitch pattern. I really want to keep this one for myself, but I am (probably) going to be nice and gift it to my beautiful sister-in-law for her birthday.

This pattern is a little scary at first because you begin by wrapping yarn over your needle in one row and then dropping it off in the next.  Once you get the hang of it, you'll see that the technique is nothing to be afraid of.

Materials



Gauge


21 sts = 4 inches

Finished Measurements


7 1/2 inches wide x 50 inches long

Directions


CO 38.
Row 1 (RS): K all sts.
Row 2 (WS): K all sts.
Row 3: K7, [yo, k1, 2 yo, k1, 3 yo, k1, 2 yo, k1, yo, k6] 3 times, k1.
Row 4: K7, [drop yo, k1, drop 2 yo, k1, drop 3 yo, k1, drop 2 yo, k1, drop yo, k6] 3 times, k1.
Row 5-7: K all sts.
Row 8: K2, [yo, k1, 2 yo, k1, 3 yo, k1, 2 yo, k1, yo, k6] 3 times, yo, k1, 2 yo, k1, 3 yo, k1, 2 yo, k1, yo, k2.
Row 9: K2, [drop yo, k1, drop 2 yo, k1, drop 3 yo, k1, drop 2 yo, k1, drop yo, k6] 3 times, drop yo, k1, drop 2 yo, k1, drop 3 yo, k1, drop 2 yo, k1, drop yo, k2.
Row 10: K all sts.

Repeat Rows 1-10 until piece measures 50 inches. Bind off all sts leaving a long tail. Use the tail to join the ends of the scarf.

The scarf can be worn long with a single loop around your neck.

Unwind Infinity Scarf: Loosen up with this free knit pattern for spring

Or wrap it around twice for a loose cowl.

Unwind Infinity Scarf: Loosen up with this free knit pattern for spring

Happy knitting!




Knitting Pattern: Simple Reversible Boot Cuffs

This easy to knit boot cuff pattern is a simple stash buster projectOver the holidays, I had the cutest outfit planned for a work event and found myself in need of a set of boot cuffs to complete my look. Since I am a knitting geek, I immediately raided my yarn stash to see what I could whip up. This wasn't a project I ever intended to blog about.

In my creative frenzy, I was indecisive about what color yarn I should use, mainly because I didn't think I had enough of either of the yarns I liked. Then I had an epiphany, why not use both colors! That way, later, the cuff could be reversed for different outfits.

My cuffs are about 5 inches wide by 8 inches long. I used Lion Brand Jiffy Yarn and Lion Brand Fisherman's Wool on US size 10 knitting needles and cast on 44 sts, but you can easily adapt this pattern to use any color or weight yarn for a quick and easy stash buster project that will accommodate super skinny or fabulously full legs.

This easy to knit boot cuff pattern is a simple stash buster project

Materials


  • two colors of leftover yarn from your stash (They should be a similar yarn weight.)
  • dpn or circular knitting needles appropriate for the weight of your yarn


Directions


This design is worked in the round. With your first color, co any multiple of 4 sts. The length of the cast on edge should be about 3/4 of the circumference of your leg.

Rnd 1: *k3, p1* around
Rnd 2: *k1, sl 1, k1, p1* around

Repeat Rnd 1-2 until piece measures 3-4 inches from cast on edge.

Switch to the second color and work Rnd 1-2 for an additional 3-4 inches.

Bind off.

I ended up wearing my cuffs with the lighter side showing because it matched my poncho, but I'll definitely try the darker color with another outfit.

This easy to knit boot cuff pattern is a simple stash buster project




Knitting Pattern: Wintermint Sock Trio

Free Knitting Pattern: Make a trio of striped, red, green and white knit socks to share your Christmas spirit!November is here and for me that means it is officially sock knitting season. I adore hand knit socks. I love to make them. I love to wear them. I love to give them as Christmas gifts!

This is a kind of unconventional knitting pattern because it makes three "mismatched" socks. They are a stripey and fun way to show some holiday spirit.

These socks should comfortably accommodate an averaged sized woman's feet (foot circumference of 8 inches and foot length of 8 1/2 inches), approximately US 6-9 shoe size.

Materials


3 - 50 g/220 yd balls of Cobasi by Hikoo

US size 4 (3.5 mm) dpns

Gauge


26 sts and 40 rows of stockinette = 4 inches

Abbreviations


k - knit
p - purl
sl - slip 1 stitch purlwise
ssk - slip two stitches individually knitwise then knit them together through the back loops
p2tog - purl two stitches together
k2tog - knit two stitches together
pu - pick up
RS - right side
WS - wrong side

Color Order


Sock 1: color A - green, color B - Red, color C - white
Sock 2: color A - white, color B - green, color C - red
Sock 3: color A - red, color B - white, color C - green



Directions


Except for the heel flap, turn heel and toe, the sock is worked by alternating yarn colors every round. Begin by alternating colors A and B for 12 rows, then A and C for 12 rows. Repeat.

Color A produces the elongated stitches in the vertical stripes. Colors B and C create the wide horizontal stripes.

Leg

CO 56 sts across 3-4 dpn.

Rnd 1 (color A): *P1, k3* around.
Rnd 2 (color B or C): *P1, k1, sl 1, k1* around.

Repeat Rnd 1 and 2 until piece measures 4 ½ inches (48 rnds).

Break B and C.

Heel flap

The entire heel flap and turn heel are worked in color A.

Turn work, sl1, p27 onto a single needle, turn. Place remaining 28 sts onto a stitch holder or spare dpn to work later for instep.

Row 1 (RS): *Sl1, k1* across, turn.
Row 2 (WS): Sl 1, p27, turn.

Repeat Row 1 and 2 twelve more times.

Turn Heel

Row 1 (RS): Sl1, k15, ssk, k1, turn.
Row 2 (WS): Sl1, p5, p2tog, p1, turn.
Row 3: Sl1, k to 1 stitch before the gap, ssk, k1, turn.
Row 4: Sl 1, p to 1 stitch before the gap, p2tog, p1, turn.

Repeat Row 3 and 4 until all stitches have been worked ending after a WS row. Omit the last k1 and p1 on the final RS and WS rows.

Sl1, k7, do not turn. This will now be the beginning of each remaining round.

Heel Gusset and Foot

With color A and a new needle (needle 1) k8 remaining turn heel sts, pu 14 sts, knitwise, along the heel flap. With another needle (needle 2) k acros 28 held sts. With another needle (needle 3) pu 14 sts, knitwise, along heel flap, k8 turn heel sts.

Rnd 1 (color B): On needle 1, *sl1, k3* 4 times, sl1, k2, k2tog, k1; on needle 2, K2, *sl1, k3* 6times, sl1, k1; on needle 3, k1, ssk, k3, *sl1, k3* 4 times.

Rnd 2 and all even rounds (color A): K all sts.

Rnd 3 (color B): On needle 1, *sl1, k3* 4 times, sl1, k1, k2tog, k1; on needle 2, K2, *sl1, k3* 6times, sl1, k1; on needle 3, k1, ssk, k2, *sl1, k3* 4 times.
Rnd 5 (color B): On needle 1, *sl1, k3* 4 times, sl1, k2tog, k1; on needle 2, K2, *sl1, k3* 6times, sl1, k1; on needle 3, k1, ssk, k1, *sl1, k3* 4 times.
Rnd 7 (color B): On needle 1, *sl1, k3* 4 times, k2tog, k1; on needle 2, K2, *sl1, k3* 6times, sl1, k1; on needle 3, k1, ssk, *sl1, k3* 4 times.
Rnd 9 (color B): On needle 1, *sl1, k3* 3 times, sl1, k2, k2tog, k1; on needle 2, K2, *sl1, k3* 6times, sl1, k1; on needle 3, k1, ssk, k3, *sl1, k3* 3 times.
Rnd 11 (color B): On needle 1, *sl1, k3* 3 times, sl1, k1, k2tog, k1; on needle 2, K2, *sl1, k3* 6times, sl1, k1; on needle 3, k1, ssk, k2, *sl1, k3* 3 times.

Rnd 13 (color C): On needle 1, *sl1, k3* 3 times, sl1, k2tog, k1; on needle 2, K2, *sl1, k3* 6times, sl1, k1; on needle 3, k1, ssk, k1, *sl1, k3* 3 times.
Rnd 15 (color C): On needle 1, *sl1, k3* 3 times, k2tog, k1; on needle 2, K2, *sl1, k3* 6times, sl1, k1; on needle 3, k1, ssk, k1, *sl1, k3* 3 times.

Rnd 16 (color A): K all sts.
Rnd 17 (color B or C): *Sl1, K3* around.

Repeat Rnd 16 and 17 until piece measures 7 inches from the back of the heel (60 rounds from the beginning of the heel gusset).

Break colors B and C.

Toe

The entire toe is worked in color A.

Rnd 1: On needle 1, k to last 2 sts, k2tog; on needle 2, ssk, k to last 2 sts, k2tog; on needle 3, ssk, k to end of needle.
Rnd 2: K all sts.

Repeat Rnds 1 and 2 until 40 sts remain.

Repeat Rnd 1 until 8 sts remain. K 2 sts from needle 1 onto needle 3.

Break yarn leaving an 18 inch tail. Use Kitchner stitch to graft the toe sts.

Free Knitting Pattern: Make a trio of striped, red, green and white knit socks to share your Christmas spirit!

Happy sock making!




Knit Pattern: Chinese Fans Infinity Scarf

Free Knit Pattern: Learn the Chinese Fan Stitch and create a lightweight infinity necklace with sock weight yarnI had a tough time deciding whether I should post this pattern now or wait until next spring. This colorful infinity scarf is a lightweight accessory, so it's best for cool, not cold weather.

Here in Tucson, the temperatures rarely drop below freezing, so I like to wear scarves like this from November to March, so why wait?

Let's start knitting!

Materials


Abbreviations


CO -cast on
p - purl
k - knit
ssk - slip two stitches individually, knitwise then knit the stitches together through the back loops
yo - bring the working yarn forward, then over the right needle
k2tog - knit 2 stitches together
RS - right side
WS - wrong side

Directions


It's a scarf. I didn't work out an official gauge swatch for this project, but 40 sts in the pattern is approximately 5 1/2 inches. If you work a few rows of the pattern and your scarf is significantly wider or narrower, try a different set of needles.

Also, you don't have to use stitch markers, but it makes it easier to keep your place in the pattern.

CO 40

Row 1 (RS):P40, turn.

Row 2 (WS): K 40, turn.

Row 3: P2, place marker, *ssk, yo, k1, yo, k4, k2tog, place marker* 4 times, p2, turn.

Rows 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12: K2, p36, k2, turn.

Row 5: P2, *ssk, k1, yo, k1, yo, k3, k2tog* 4 times, p2, turn.

Row 7: P2, *ssk, k2, yo, k1, yo, k2, k2tog* 4 times, p2, turn.

Row 9: P2, *ssk, k3, yo, k1, yo, k1, k2tog* 4 times, p2, turn.

Row 11: P2, *ssk, k4, yo, k1, yo, k2tog* 4 times, p2, turn.

Repeat Rows 1-12 until piece measures 48 inches.

Bind off leaving a long tail. Use the yarn tail to join the two short sides of the scarf. Your scarf can be looped once and worn like a cowl (as shown above) or don't loop it at all for a long and lean look.

Free Knit Pattern: Learn the Chinese Fan Stitch and create a lightweight infinity necklace with sock weight yarn

Happy knitting!



Tutorial: Angel Wings Baby Onesie

Free Silhouette Studio Cut File: How to make a pair of sparkly, angel wings onesies with heat transfer materialA few weeks ago I bought a Tulip Fashion Glitter Iron-On Transfer Sheet and used it to make a personalized 18th birthday shirt for my daughter. It was a super easy way to add a little sparkle to my project.

I had a scrap of the glitter sheet left, so I thought it would be fun to cut out a design with my Silhouette Cameo and create a pair of angel wing Onesies for my niece, who's due in a couple months. I wish I could be at the baby shower because I think these will be a popular gift.

Materials



Directions


I started by drawing out an angel wings design then using the "trace" feature in Silhouette Studio to size and cut my image. You are welcome to download my hand drawn angel wings image or my Silhouette Studio V3 angel wings cut file and use them for your personal (not for sale) projects.

Open the cut file and cut your design. (In the Cut Settings menu I set the Material Type as Heat Transfer Material - flocked. I also changed the blade depth from 3 to 4.)


I was really impressed by how nicely my Silhouette Cameo cut through the glitter sheets!
Position the wings on the back of your Onesies. Place a lightweight press cloth over the wings and iron with high heat and no steam for about 40 seconds or until the design is completely set.
If you want to add a little more bling - of course you do - you can cut the word "ANGEL" for the front of your Onesies.

Simply add text to a blank Silhouette Studio file in your favorite font. (I used AR CENA sized at 125 pt.)


Cut out your text, position in on the front of the Onesie and iron on.

Free Silhouette Studio Cut File: How to make a pair of sparkly, angel wings onesies with heat transfer material




Sewing Tutorial: Teddy Bear Onesie

Sewing Tutorial: How to personalize a baby Onesie with a cookie cutter appliqueI'm in the process of putting together a baby shower gift for my sister-in-law who is expecting baby #3. Of course, I knit an afghan, that's kind of my thing. I want to include a couple other little treats for the baby, as well.

Now it's been a long time since my girl was a baby. As memory serves, one of the essentials in our diaper bag was a clean Onesie. As a new mommy, I didn't have much time for personalizing such items for my daughter. Perhaps I was too sleep deprived. However, as an aunt, I have plenty of time to brighten up a basic five-pack of Onesies with some crafty TLC.

My first idea, applique!

Materials



Directions

So, you may be looking at my materials list going, "Huh! Why would you need a cookie cutter for a sewing project?" Here's my crafting secret. Cookie cutters make great templates for applique. Even better, you probably have a stash of them buried in your cupboard somewhere. I used a teddy bear that is about 4-inches tall, but just about any simple shape will work.

Make a pattern by tracing your cookie cutter onto a piece of paper. Too tricky to trace? Tap the cutter onto a stamp pad and "stamp" the image onto your paper.

Tip: If you don't have a cookie cutter handy, there are tons of line drawings available on the internet.
Use an iron to fuse the interfacing to the back of your fabric.
Pin the paper pattern to your fabric.
Cut around the pattern.
Position the fabric piece onto the Onesie and pin.
Finally, blanket stitch, around your fabric with tiny stitches.
Here's a quick refresher on how to Blanket Stitch.

Applique: How to Blanket Stitch


Pulling this little Onesie out of the diaper bag is sure to make any mom smile.

Sewing Tutorial: How to personalize a baby Onesie with a cookie cutter applique