Showing posts with label etching. Show all posts
Showing posts with label etching. Show all posts

6 Stages of Crafting


While I was working on my chair re-upholstery project, I began thinking about the process I go through during every project that I work on. Big or small, it's always the same. If you are a crafter or love a crafter, my theory may help you understand and work through this crazy routine. Let me explain.

You may be familiar with the Five Stages of Problem Solving.

  1. Defining the problem
  2. Producing ideas
  3. Testing ideas
  4. Choosing an idea
  5. Planning for action

And you have probably heard of the Seven Stages of Grief.

  1. Shock and Denial
  2. Pain and Guilt
  3. Anger and Bargaining
  4. Depression, Reflection and Loneliness
  5. Upward Turn
  6. Reconstruction and Working Through
  7. Acceptance and Hope

My theory is that somewhere between these two philosophies lie the Six Stages of Crafting.

1. Inspiration and Enthusiasm

It occurs when you least expect it. You may see a picture in a magazine, an item in a store or maybe you run across an idea on the internet (like when you are still scrolling through Pinterest at 2 a.m.). All of a sudden, you have the spark that pushes you to create your next masterpiece and you can't wait to get started.

2. Organization and Procurement

You know what you want to make. Now you need to figure out exactly how you are going to do it. You skim through a tutorial, realize you don't have any of the necessary supplies, head to the store and buy everything you think you will need (and then some.)

3. Initiation

You have the tools and supplies and are about to begin. You get out the glue and scissors and start crafting...

Then life happens!

The kids need a ride to soccer practice. The dog has an appointment at the groomers. Eight loads of laundry, including soccer uniforms, are piled across the living room floor. Something is burning on the stove. Your husband is running late. By the way, you are out of milk, eggs, bread, peanut butter, cereal and bananas.

4. Frustration and Anxiety

The kids are at their friend's house. The dog has been fed. Your husband is watching the big game. Now, you finally have time to work on your project. You are just getting started when you realize one of the following things:

  • You forgot to get one critical material or tool
  • You did not buy enough (choose one or more) fabric, yarn, paint, glue, glitter...
  • Somehow, you measured once and cut twice instead of the other way around
  • The directions said "Easy," but unless you are Martha friggin' Stewart there's no way

At this point you may regress and repeat Stages 2, 3 and 4, or toss the project into a dark corner for days, weeks, months, years, even decades. Either way, these things take time.

5. Reflection and Determination

You are back on Pinterest (at 2 a.m.) where you are reminded of your project, lurking in the shadows, as you peruse the 237 pins on your "Projects to Try" board. You also notice your "My Finished Projects" board. Really, 0 pins?

That settles it. Who does that Martha Stewart think she is anyway?

You retrieve your project from its hiding place with a new sense of purpose and continue where you left off. This time things are going to be different.

6. Completion

After countless hours, trips to the craft store and anxiety attacks, it's done. Did it turn out like the Pinterest photo? Maybe not, but that's okay. You created it with your own two hands, passion and a little bit of luck. You breathe a sigh of relief.

You get distracted while you are pinning a picture onto "My Finished Projects" when you see another exciting creation on "Projects to Try."

And why do we subject ourselves to these 6 Stages of Crafting, over and over again?

Because crafting is relaxing and fun, of course!

Happy crafting.




Etched Champagne Flutes

I love glass etching because it is a simple and inexpensive way to create personalized and meaningful gifts. Last year I shared how to etch your name onto glass bakeware, create one of a kind candle holders, and even gave you a peek at some drinking glasses I made as a Christmas gift.

Now it's time for easy (and romantic) etched champagne flutes, just in time for Valentine's Day. You don't need any stencils or tape, just some etching cream, Elmer's glue, a paintbrush, and a little creativity.

Materials


  • champagne flute
  • Elmer's glue
  • thin paint brush
  • latex gloves
  • etching cream
  • wide, flat paintbrush

Directions

 

My favorite place to buy glassware for etching is our local Cost Plus World Market. They have a great selection of glassware that won't break the bank. I got champagne flutes for $1.99 each.

Before you begin, wash your glass in hot soapy water and dry it completely. Etching works best on a nice, clean surface.









Use a liner brush or other narrow paintbrush to paint the word "Love" onto your champagne flute with Elmer's glue. Of course you can choose to use a different word on your creation. A set of two glasses with the words "Bride" and "Groom" or "His" and "Hers" would be a great engagement, wedding or anniversary gift.

I made a set that has the words "Love", "Life", "Family" and "Friends" that I hope to use for a New Year's toast sometime.



Let the glue dry. You will notice that it becomes almost transparent once it dries.









Now it's time for the etching. Read the package directions on your etching cream. For your safety, put on some latex gloves. Etching cream can cause some serious burns if it gets on your skin. It's also a good idea to set down a towel or some newspaper to protect your work surface. (It would be a pity to spill etching cream on your granite counter tops because it will leave a mark.)

With a wide brush, apply a thick coat of etching cream over your glue word roughly in the shape of a rectangle.

It's okay if it's a little rough around the edges. That's what makes it uniquely wonderful.

Wait about five minutes, or follow the package recommendation.




Make sure you are still wearing your latex gloves. Rinse the glass in warm water and rub off all of the etching cream as well as the dried glue.

Dry your glass.









Cheers!











Etched Glass Candle Holder

You've invited the guests and planned the menu for your holiday gathering. Now it's time to add a little ambiance. I love to use candles during festive gatherings to give to our home some extra sparkle.

With a little bit of time, an adhesive stencil, and some etching cream, you can transform a plain glass candle holder into a creative home accent for any occasion. These also make pretty gifts. You can use inexpensive glass candle holders from a craft store, grocery store, or big box store. I found mine at Cost Plus World Market for $1.99 each.

Materials


  • square glass candle holder
  • Contact Paper
  • die cut machine
  • safety glasses
  • latex gloves
  • etching cream
  • small paint brush

Directions


Start by washing and drying your candle holder.

Before you can begin etching, use your die cut machine to create a stencil with the design of your choice. I have the Silhouette Cameo Starter Kit Bundle Cutter, and I love it! I chose to do a pattern with some stars.

Cut your stencil on Contact Paper.

Remove the pieces you want etched to create the stencil.



Gather your etching materials.









Remove the backing from your Contact Paper stencil.

Carefully adhere the stencil to your candle holder. Rub out any bubbles near the etching area. You want a nice smooth edge that the etching cream won't seep under.

I etched an image on each side of the candle holder. Depending on the size and shape of the stencil you make, you may decide to only etch on one or two sides of the candle holder.


Before you open the etching cream, read all the directions and safety precautions on the package.

Completely cover your work surface. Put on safety glasses and latex gloves.

Paint a thick layer of etching cream over your stencils. Let the etching cream stay on your project for at least 3-4 minutes or the time recommended on the package.

While you are waiting, clean your paintbrush.

Thoroughly rinse the etching cream from your candle holder with cool water. Remove and discard your stencil and rinse the candle holder one more time to make sure all the etching cream is removed.


Once your creation is clean and dry you are ready to add the candle.

A single candle holder is beautiful, but if you have the time, a set of three makes a bolder statement on your dining table.

Also, with Christmas just around the corner, consider making etched glass candle holders as gifts. They are an inexpensive and thoughtful way to give someone a hand crafted, personalized gift for their home.


Personalized Glass Baking Dish

Thanksgiving is days away and that is just the beginning of the holiday season. I am preparing to celebrate, socialize, and enjoy some great food with my friends and family. I'm sure to get plenty of use out of my casserole dishes over the next few weeks.

This personalized project is great for anyone who doesn't want to lose their favorite glass baking dish when they bring it to a large gathering. Etch your name on a dish so you are sure to get it back after the festivities. This would also make a great handmade Christmas, birthday, anniversary or wedding gift.

Materials


  • glass baking dish
  • die cut machine
  • Contact Paper
  • safety glasses
  • latex gloves
  • etching cream
  • paint brush

Directions


Start by washing and drying your glass baking dish.

Before you can begin etching, use your die cut machine to create a stencil with the name, words, or design of your choice. I have the Silhouette Cameo Starter Kit Bundle Cutter, and I love it!

Cut your stencil on Contact Paper.

Remove the pieces you want etched to create the stencil.



Gather your etching materials.









Remove the backing from your Contact Paper stencil.









Carefully adhere the stencil to your glass baking pan. Rub out any bubbles near the etching area. You want a nice smooth edge that the etching cream won't seep under.








Don't forget to stick on the centers of open letters like A, B, D, O, P, Q, and R.









Before you open the etching cream, read all the directions and safety precautions on the package.

Completely cover your work surface. Put on safety glasses and latex gloves.

Paint a thick layer of etching cream over your stencil. Let the etching cream stay on your project for 3-4 minutes or the time recommended on the package.

While you are waiting, clean your paintbrush.

Thoroughly rinse the etching cream from your dish with cool water. Remove and discard your stencil and rinse the dish one more time to make sure all the etching cream is removed.

It's time to do some baking and enjoy your personalized glass dish.

Happy baking and sharing this holiday season!