Showing posts with label fabric. Show all posts
Showing posts with label fabric. Show all posts

Sewing Pattern: Small Project Bag for Knitters

Free Sewing Pattern: Small travel bag for your knit and crochet projects.

At the beginning of the year I started attending a monthly sock knitting group at my local yarn store. It is so refreshing to chat with other knitters, see their projects and share tips and ideas. Of course having a small project bag dedicated to my sock club projects is handy, so I raided my fabric stash to stitch up a cheery tote.

Materials


  • 1/3 yd each of 2 coordinating fabrics (one for the bag and one for the lining)
  • Dritz 1/4" eyelets with setting tool
  • hammer
  • 1 x 2 inch piece of fusible interfacing
  • iron
  • 2/3 yd of 1/8-inch elastic cord
  • Dritz cord stop
  • compass, paper, pencil
  • sewing, measuring and cutting supplies

Directions


Before you start cutting your fabric, you'll need to draw a template for the bottom piece of the bag. Using a compass, draw a circle with a 3 3/8 inch radius on a piece of paper and cut out the circle.

Cut a rectangle that's 19 1/16 inches wide x 11 3/4 inches tall from both the outer and lining fabrics. Use your circle template to cut a circle from both the outer and lining fabrics.
Before sewing, the eyelets need to be attached to the outer bag fabric. Fold the outer fabric in half width-wise and finger press the center line.
Using a fabric marking pen or pencil make a mark 1 3/4 inches below the top edge of the fabric and 1/2 inch to either side of the center line.
Attach a piece of fusible interfacing on the wrong side of the outer fabric behind the eyelet marks according to the manufacturer's instructions.
With scissors or a hammer and the eyelet tool, cut/punch 1/4 inch holes centered over your marks.

(Note: As I was writing this post I discovered that my style of eyelet tool is fairly old and may not be available anymore. Some of the newer tools only secure the eyelets and can not be used for making the hole.)
Insert the eyelets into the holes from front to back.
Use a hammer and the other end of the eyelet tool to flatten and secure the eyelets.
Fold the top edge of both the outer and lining fabrics over 1/2 inch and press with an iron.
Now it's time to sew. First assemble the outer portion of the bag, then repeat the same process for the lining.

Unfold the top edge of the bag. Fold the bag in half width-wise, right sides together and stitch the side using a 1/2 inch seam allowance.
Attaching the round bag bottom can be a little intimidating so it is helpful to make some temporary guidelines to help with the placement.
Fold the bottom piece in half and finger press the center line.
Fold the piece in half again and finger press the center line.
Unfold the circle and you can see the quadrants nicely marked.
Next, finger press the fold opposite the seam on the side of the bag.
Fold again so that your finger pressed line is even with your stitches and finger press.
Now the bottom of the bag is also divided into quadrants.
With right sides together, align the quadrant lines of the circular bottom with the quadrant lines on the bag and pin in place.
Carefully align the edges and pin around the remainder of the bag bottom.

Stitch around the bag bottom using a 1/2 inch seam allowance.
Turn the outer bag right side out. The lining can remain wrong side out. Make sure the top edges are folded down.
Insert the lining into the bag. With wrong sides together, align the side seams of the outer and lining fabric. Pin around the top edge of the bag.
Stitch around the top of the bag 1/8 inch from the edge.
Create a channel for the drawstring by stitching around the top of the bag approximately 1/4 inch above and below the eyelet edges.

Pull the cord through the channel and secure with a cord stop.
And finally, the very best part, fill your bag with yarn, your latest project and your favorite knitting necessities like a Clover quick locking stitch marker set and a cute tape measure (mine is from All About the Buttons).

Free Sewing Pattern: Small travel bag for your knit and crochet projects.


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Crafter Thoughts: T-Shirt Refashioning

How to move the print from an old T-Shirt to a new one.When we went to Scandinavia this summer, I picked up a cute burn out t-shirt from Finland. After we got home, I think I wore it twice and then something bad happened. I'd like to say it was my husband's fault, but I am completely to blame.

I did not follow the washing instructions. As a fiber enthusiast, I should have known better. After a trip through the dryer, the burnout shirt was basically see through except for the printed area. Then it hung it my closet, unwearable for months.

Luckily, I have a couple blog friends (Lisa from Cucicucicoo and Agy from Green Issues by Agy) who frequently post about mending and altering textiles. So I thought I would do a little t-shirt refashioning of my own.

I hang my head in shame as I show you my burned out burn out. :( Luckily, I found a plain blue shirt ready to be spruced up with a new look.
I started by cutting out the printed area on the old shirt leaving a couple inches around the printed area.
Next I applied a lightweight, fusible interfacing to the back side of the image. This is a good thing to do any time you are going to cut up a t shirt. It stabilizes the area and keeps it from fraying.
Then, I cut out the image.

I had a bit of Pellon Wonder Web in my sewing stash and decided to use it to fuse the image to my new shirt.

I cut the Wonder Web slightly smaller than the image because the web tends to spread out a little as it melts.
Next, I positioned my image on the new shirt with the Wonder Web between the image and the front of the new shirt.

Pro Tip - When you are placing an image onto a shirt, a good rule of thumb is that the top of the image should be 3-4 finger widths from the bottom of a rounded neck line.
With the help of a press cloth and my iron, the image was fused to the new shirt in seconds.

Theoretically, I could have stopped there. The Wonder Web should hold the image and shirt together.
But I wanted to add my own little personal touch, so I grabbed a needle and some embroidery floss and did a blanket stitch around the outer edge of the image and a simple backstitch on one of the inner borders.
I am so happy I was able to save my vacation souvenir and refashion it into a wearable shirt.

How to move the logo or image from a worn tee shirt onto a new shirt or bag.


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Sewing Pattern: On the Go Backpack

DIY Sewing Pattern and Tutorial: How to make an On the Go Backpack.Whenever we travel I swap out my purse for a more roomy backpack so I can carry my tablet, a magazine, wallet, keys, travel documents and of course at least one knitting project. Of course I also like to have a water bottle or two handy because sight seeing makes me thirsty.

This backpack is my new favorite. It's 11 inches wide by 16 inches deep. It closes with a drawstring that is covered with a flap. There are two generous pockets on the outside that have a stretchy elastic top and two generous, elastic-free pockets inside.

The construction is a little unconventional because that's the way my engineering mind works. Hopefully the method makes this bag easier to assemble than other backpack patterns you may have tried.

Materials



Tools


  • sewing, cutting and measuring tools
  • lighter
  • pliers
  • hammer

Directions


This pattern uses 1/2 inch seam allowances unless otherwise noted.

Cutting out the Pieces

Begin by washing, drying and pressing your fabric.

Print the pattern pieces. Make sure you "print actual size" and do not scale the pieces to fit the page.

Cut out the paper pieces. You will need to cut 4 lower strap holders, 2 bag bottoms and 2 strap connectors.

Tape the two bag bottom pieces together along the dotted line to create a single bottom piece.
With tissue paper or a large roll of paper, cut out:
     2 - 14 1/4 x 17 inch pieces (bag front and back)
     1 - 14 1/4 x 19 inch piece (pocket)
     4 - 3 x 15 inch pieces (straps)

From the lining fabric cut 1 bag front, 1 bag back, 1 pocket, 1 flap, 1 bottom, 2 strap connectors.

You may need to position the pieces different than shown depending on the width of your fabric.
From the outer bag fabric cut 1 bag front, 1 bag back, 1 pocket, 1 flap, 1 bottom, 4 straps, 1 loop, 4 lower strap holders.

You may need to position the pieces different than shown depending on the width of your fabric.

The Little Things

Cut the nylon strap in half and carefully use a lighter to fuse the ends so the strap will not fray.
Press a 2 x 2 inch piece of interfacing to a scrap of fabric. Cut 4, 1-inch squares. These pieces will be used later to reinforce the snaps and grommets.
Fold the loop in half lengthwise, right sides together. Stitch along the long edge. Turn right side out. Press so the seam is at the center back of the piece. Stitch lengthwise 1/4 inch from each side.

Upper Strap


Fold the strap connectors in half lengthwise, right sides together. Stitch along the long edge. Turn right side out. Press so the seams are at the center back of the pieces. Stitch lengthwise 1/4 inch from each side.
Pull a strap connector around the upper bar of the strap adjuster so the wrong sides are together.
Position one piece of strap fabric on your work surface, right side up. Center a strap connector on a short edge of the strap. Position second piece of strap fabric, right side down over the first. Stitch along the long side of the strap, one short side (securing the strap connector), and the other long side.
Stitch short, diagonal lines on each side of the strap from the short edge to the long edge on either side of the strap connector being careful not to catch the strap connector in your stitches.
Trim the strap and turn right side out.
Repeat the process for the second strap and press both.

Stitch 1/4 inch from the sides around the straps.

Lower Strap


Place two lower strap holders, right sides together. Stitch one of the short sides of the triangle.
Position a nylon strap between the triangles so the long edge is against the first seam and the short edge is aligned with the unstitched, short side of the triangles. Stitch in place.
Turn right side out and press. (Be careful not to press the nylon strap or it could melt.)
Trim the excess fabric.

Stitch 1/4 inch from the seams. Repeat the process for the second lower strap.

Bag Lining


Fold the pocket in half widthwise, wrong sides together, and press. Stitch 1/2 inch from folded edge. Mark the center of the pocket (7 1/8 inch from either side).
Position bag lining front, right side up, on your work surface. Place the pocket on the lining front and stitch along the center line of the pocket.
Place the bag lining front and back, right sides together and stitch side seams.

Turn right side out and press seams toward the bag lining back.

Outer Bag


Fold the outer pocket in half widthwise, wrong sides together and press. Mark the center of the pocket (7 1/8 inches from either side).
Center the elastic between the pocket fabric so it is against the fold and pin in place. Stitch across the pocket 1/4 inch below the lower edge of the elastic being careful not to catch the elastic in your stitches.
Position the outer bag front, right side up, on your work surface. Place the outer pocket on the bag front and stitch down the center line of the pocket.
Pull elastic so 2 inches is exposed on either side of the pocket. Pin elastic to pocket on each side and trim the exposed pieces.
Place lower strap holders, as shown, so the lowest corner is 1/2 inch from the bag bottom and the straps point up towards the top of the bag. Place the outer bag back and outer bag front right sides together and stitch side seams.
Turn right side out and press seams toward the bag back.

Flap


Position the flap lining wrong side up. Center the snap disk so its lower edge is 1 1/2 inches from the lower flap edge and mark the side slits.
Press a 1 inch square of interfacing over the slit marks and use a sharp scissors to cut the slits. Push the thinner snap legs through the slits, right side to wrong side.
Center the disk on a square reinforcement piece. Mark and cut the side slits.
Slide the reinforcement square over the snap legs. Slide the disk over the snap legs.

Use a pliers to bend the snap legs over.
Place flap fabrics, right sides together, and stitch around leaving the top edge open.

Turn the flap right side out and press. Stitch around 1/4 inch from seams.

Bag Hardware


Center the snap disc on wrong side of outer bag front fabric so the lower edge of the disk is 1 inch above the top edge of the pocket and mark the side slits.
Press a 1 inch square of interfacing over the slit marks and cut slits. Push the snap legs through the slits, right side to wrong side.
Center the disk on a square reinforcement piece. Mark and cut the side slits.
Slide the reinforcement square over the snap legs. Slide the disk over the snap legs. Use a pliers to bend the snap legs over.
Make marks on the wrong side of the bag front, 1 3/4 inches from the top edge and 6 5/8 inches from each side. (The two marks will be one inch apart.)
Press a 1 x 2 inch piece of interfacing over the marks.
Use the grommet tool and a hammer to punch holes on the two marks and at the center of two reinforcement squares.
Press grommets through the bag, right side to wrong side. Place a reinforcement square over each grommet. Use the grommet tool and a hammer to tightly secure the grommets.

Attaching the Bag Bottoms

Fold the bag bottoms in half lengthwise, wrong sides together, and press.
Pin the bag lining bottom to the bag lining, right sides together. The pressed center line on the bottom should align with the side seams. It is best to pin around the curved edges first, then the straight edges. Stitch the bottom to the bag. Repeat for the outer bag fabric.

Straps,  Loop and Flap


Place the upper straps, side by side, right side up.
Center the loop ends on the top edge of the straps, wrong side down and pin in place.
Center the flap on the top edge of the straps, lining side up, and pin in place. Baste across 1/4 inch from the top edge.
Center the straps/loop/flap piece on the right side of the outer bag back and pin in place. Baste 3/8 inch from the top edge of the bag.

Finishing


Slide outer bag into lining, right sides together. Pin in place, aligning side seams. Stitch around leaving a 4-6 inch opening at the front of the bag.
Turn bag right side out through the opening. Press around the top edge of the bag. Stitch around the bag 1/8 inch from the top edge.
Create a channel for the drawstring by stitching around the bag 3/4 inch and 1 3/4 inch from the top edge of the bag being careful not to catch the straps or flap in the stitches.

Pull the drawstring through the channel and through the cord stop. Knot ends and trim if desired.
Pull nylon straps around the lower bar of the strap adjusters.
Fold the ends of the nylon strap under 1/2 inch, twice, and stitch to secure.
Fill your backpack with your favorite travel essentials and you are ready for an adventure! Bon voyage!

DIY Sewing Pattern and Tutorial: How to make an On the Go Backpack.

DIY Sewing Pattern and Tutorial: How to make an On the Go Backpack.

Happy sewing and happy exploring!


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