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Showing posts with label organization. Show all posts
Showing posts with label organization. Show all posts

DIY Cork Board Jewelry Organizer

DIY Inspiration: How to make a cork board jewelry organizerMy name is Ellen and I like shiny things. The problem is storing my shiny things. I am not a jewelry box person. I just don't have a lot of space and when it comes to jewelry it's out of sight, out my mind. If I don't see it, I won't wear it. So, I've been struggling with a jewelry organization solution for longer than I care to admit.

I have a bare wall next to my bathroom sink that looked like it could be transformed into a vertical space for storing my jewelry making everything easily accessible as I am getting ready in the morning.

My first thought was to install some sort of  box or medicine cabinet type fixture. However I really wanted something with a simpler, cleaner design. Then, I toyed with the idea of hanging everything on a cork board but I was afraid it would be boring. Luckily I have the perfect tool for personalizing things to make them pretty, my Silhouette Cameo.

Materials




Downloads




Directions


I'm not going to give specific measurements for this project because it will all depend how large you want to make your organizer. Instead, I'll just show you my process.

I started by laying out my jewelry to see how it could be arranged and to get an idea of what size cork board I  would need.

I ended up with a fairly large 22 x 35 inch board.
When I was shopping for the perfect cork board, I looked for one with a nice flat, wide frame that I could personalize.

Initially I was going to create my own stencil and paint a border. Eventually, I decided it would be easier to use my Cameo to cut a simple vine design out of vinyl and stick it onto the frame.
Of course I had already purchased a couple sheets of stencil plastic. I still found a purpose for them and used my Cameo again to cut out a set of earring cards to hold my smaller studs.

(I set the cut settings on my Cameo to blade depth 8, speed 1, thickness 33 for cutting the plastic sheets.)
Free Silhouette Studio Cut File: Tags to display 5 pairs of stud earrings I think this is a pretty slick solution for compact storage of my post earrings.

My dangly hook earrings are going to be stored across three wooden dowels, painted black to match the cork board frame.
My biggest dilemma was what I would use to hang my necklaces and bracelets. Plain push pins or thumb tacks just seemed... well, tacky. And then I stumbled across hooked tacks. Why it has taken so long for someone to invent this is beyond me because they are so handy. They come in a bunch of different colors, but I bought the clear ones so they would be less noticeable.

Since I am a "measure twice and cut once" kind of girl, I used painters tape to mark where I would put the hooks and dowels on my corkboard.

I used a ruler and pen to mark the tape before I placed the hooks.
After I was satisfied with the spacing of everything, I stuck in all the pins and removed the tape.

Then it was time to mount the board on the wall.
Finally it was time to organize my bling!

DIY Inspiration: How to make a cork board jewelry organizer

Now my counter tops are free of all the jewelry box clutter and I am ready to accessorize!




Crochet Pattern: Scrap Yarn Tote

Fast Crochet Pattern: Stash Buster Market or Beach ToteWhen I finish a knit or crochet project, I just hate to throw away the leftover bits and pieces. Needless to say, that has caused my yarn sash to explode in size over the years. So, maybe it's time for a stash buster project.

I used four colors of Red Heart Super Saver Yarnand Red Heart with Love Yarn to make a scrappy market (or beach) tote. You can use up to 11 different colors of your favorite worsted weight yarn.

It's a quick and easy project made up of all sc and ch. One of my favorite features is that the handles are long enough to slip over your shoulder if you choose.

Materials

  • Approximately 370 yds/388 m of worsted weight scrap yarn in a variety of colors
  • US size H and I crochet hooks

Stitches and Abbreviations

ch - chain
sc - single crochet
sl st - slip stitch
dec - Insert hook into next stitch, yarn over and pull through one loop, insert hook into next stitch, yarn over and pull through one loop, yarn over and pull through all three loops.

Directions

This pattern is worked in continuous rounds with the right side facing. It may be helpful to mark the first stitch of each round so you don’t lose your place.

Bag Bottom

With smaller hook, ch 24.

Rnd 1: 3 sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 21 ch, 3 sc in next ch, sc in the bottom of next 21 ch.
Rnd 2: [(2 sc in next sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.
Rnd 3: [(2 sc in next sc, sc in next sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.
Rnd 4: [(Sc in next 2 sc, 2 sc in next sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.
Rnd 5: [(2 sc in next sc, sc in next 3 sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.
Rnd 6: [(Sc in next 4 sc, 2 sc in next sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.
Rnd 7: [(2 sc in next sc, sc in next 5 sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.
Rnd 8: [(Sc in next 6 sc, 2 sc in next sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.
Rnd 9: [(2 sc in next sc, sc in next 7 sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.
Rnd 10: [(Sc in next 8 sc, 2 sc in next sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.
Rnd 11: [(2 sc in next sc. Sc in next 9 sc) 3 times, sc in next 21 sc] twice.

Bag Body

Change to larger hook.

Rnd 12: *Ch 3, skip 3 sc, sc in next sc, repeat from * around changing to the next color in the last sc of the round.

Rnd 13: *Ch 4, sc in next sc, repeat from * around.
Rnd 14: *Ch 6, sc in next sc, repeat from * around.
Rnd 15: *Ch 6, sc in next sc, repeat from * around, substitute sl st for the last sc of the round.
Rnd 16: Sl st in next 2 ch, sc by inserting hook under both ch 6 arches, *ch 4, sc under next ch 6 arches, repeat from * around, for last stitch, sc in the first sc of the round changing to the next color.

Rnd 17-48: Repeat rounds 13-16, eight more times.



Bag Handles

Rnd 49: *Ch 3, sc in next sc, repeat from * around.
Rnd 50: *3 sc in next ch 3 space, sc in next sc, repeat from * around.
Rnd 51: Sc in next 108 sc. (If you haven’t been marking the first stitch of each round as you go, you may want to start now so you don’t lose your place.)
Rnd 52: Sc in next 14 sc, ch 70, skip 31 sc, sc in next 23 sc, ch 70, skip 31 sc, sc in next 9 sc.
Rnd 53: Sc in next 12 sc, dec, sc in next 70 ch, dec, sc in 19 sc, dec, sc in next 70 ch, dec, sc in 7 sc.
Rnd 54: Sc in next 12 sc, dec, sc in next 68 sc, dec, sc in next 19 sc, dec, sc in next 68 sc, dec, sc in next 7 sc.
Rnd 55: Sc in next 12 sc, dec, sc in next 66 sc, dec, sc in next 19 sc, dec, sc in next 66 sc, dec, sc in next 7 sc.
Rnd 56: Sc in next 12 sc, dec, sc in next 64 sc, dec, sc in next 19 sc, dec, sc in next 64 sc, dec, sc in next 6 sc, sl st in next sc, fasten off.

I had so much fun with the first bag, I had to try a second in different colors.

Fast Crochet Pattern: Stash Buster Market or Beach Tote


Happy crocheting and stash busting!




Sewing Tutorial: Coin Purse

Sewing Tutorial: How to make a coin purse with a purse frame and fabric scraps.For years, I have seen coin purse frames at Jo-Ann's when I am shopping. I've thought about trying them, but was always a little nervous because they don't come with any sort of pattern or directions.

I don't want to be afraid to try new crafts, so I finally bought one and attempted to make up my own pattern, which I am happy to share with you. The process is really fairly simple and this is a nice project for using up those small scraps in your fabric stash that are too pretty to throw away

Please note, this sewing project may be a little different than others you have done because you don't cut out the fabric until after most of the sewing is complete

Materials

  • coin purse frame
  • fabric scraps
  • fabric marking pen or pencil
  • embroidery floss
  • basic sewing supplies
  • ruler
  • piece of cardboard
  • compass
  • masking tape (optional)

Directions


Begin by measuring the width of your purse frame. Mine was 3 1/4 inches.
Use a compass to draw a circle with a diameter 1 - 1 1/2 inches larger than your purse frame on a piece of cardboard. (I used an empty cereal box.)

Cut out the circle template.
Choose your fabric. You will need four fabric scraps. Two pieces for the outside of your purse and two for the lining.
Place your purse frame on the wrong side of your lining pieces. Mark a line below the frame hinge on each side.
Trace around the outer edge of the frame.
You should have something like an upside down smile. It's okay if your purse frame is a different shape.
Pin one lining piece to one outer piece, right sides together.

Stitch along your traced line from one hinge mark to the other.

Repeat with the other lining and outer fabric pieces.
With one of your stitched pairs of fabric, position your cardboard circle so that it touches both hinge marks on the wrong side of the lining fabric. Trace around the lower part of the circle with a fabric pen/pencil.
With the other set of fabric, position your cardboard circle so that it touches the end of your stitching on the wrong side of the outer fabric. Trace around the lower part of the circle with a fabric pen/pencil.

The lines drawn will be where you stitch NOT where you cut.
Cut around the fabric about 1/4-inch from your marked lines.
Open up both sets of fabric and pin them so that the two lining fabrics are right sides together and the two outer fabrics are right sides together.
First, stitch around your drawn line on the outer fabrics, being careful to start and stop at the end of the frame seams.
Now do the same on the lining side leaving an opening about 1 1/2 inches so you can turn the purse.
It may seem like magic, but turn your purse right side out through the opening in the lining.
Voila!
Before you close the lining, you can use the eraser side of a pencil to push out the seams around where the purse frame will be positioned.
Press the seams around where the purse frame will be positioned.
Open the clasp and position the fabric into the groove of purse frame on each side.
I like to secure the frame with a piece of masking tape so it doesn't wiggle around while I am sewing.
Use embroidery floss to stitch the frame to the fabric.
Happily, the stitches are almost completely concealed in the groove of the purse frame. More sewing magic, I guess.
Once the purse frame is attached, use a whipstitch to close the opening at the bottom of the lining.
Your purse is ready to be filled with coins or other small items. I think I might be making another one to hold my knitting accessories (stitch markers, cable needles, stitch counters, etc.). What will you fill your purse with?

Sewing Tutorial: How to make a coin purse with a purse frame and fabric scraps.




Sponsored Tutorial: Yarn Swatch Book

Tutorial: How to make a simple yarn swatch book to store samples and labels of the yarns used for knit and crochet projectsI love yarn crafts! I almost always have some sort of knit or crochet project in progress. The rhythmic, repetitive process of both knitting and crocheting is relaxing and almost meditative.

After I finish a project I like to keep a little sample of the yarn, as well as the yarn label, so I can remember the colors or brands of yarn I used for projects and have the care instructions available if I need them.

Until recently, my storage system consisted of me throwing a couple strands of each yarn and the accompanying label into the depths of my yarn stash. With a few inexpensive office supplies and craft store finds I created a more practical way to store my samples in a simple yarn swatch book.

Many thanks to the folks at Tombow for providing the adhesive that I used in this project. If you are looking for some cool tips and project ideas, stop by the Tombow Projects Page or the  TombowUSA blog.

Materials



Directions


Even though I'm a little embarrassed about it, let me show you the mess of labels I started with.



To make a yarn swatch, use a paper trimmer to cut your cardstock into 3 7/8" x 5 7/8" rectangles. I was able to get three rectangles out of an 8 1/2" x 11" piece of paper.
Slide the paper into the plastic party bag. The bag is going to be like a mini sheet protector for your swatch.
Punch a hole about 1/4-inch from the side and closed bottom edge of the bag. Remove the card from the bag.
On the front of the card, apply a strip of the Tombow Mono Dots Adhesive. I really liked the dispenser because it's easy to use and you don't ever have to touch the sticky part with your hands.
Attach 3-4 strands of yarn to the adhesive strip. You may use more or less strands depending on the thickness of your yarn.
Use a scissors to trim off the ends of the yarn.
Now, write in the name of the yarn color.
These are all of the colors I used when I made my Knit Leaves and Branches Afghan pattern.
Turn the swatch over and apply another strip of Tombow Mono Dots Adhesive.
Attach the yarn label.
If the label is longer than the card you may wish to fold it up after it has been attached.
Gently slide the swatch into the plastic bag.
Place the card onto a binder ring. Here's the front of my swatch.
And here's the back.
I am going to keep a bunch of cards ready in their protective sleeves so I can make a new swatch whenever I finish a yarn project.

This little book is so much better than the chaotic pile of labels that used to linger in my yarn stash. Each swatch contains samples of the yarns I used for a particular project. It's quick and easy to find specific colors if I want to repeat a project and the washing and drying instructions are always handy.

Tutorial: How to make a simple yarn swatch book to store samples and labels of the yarns used for knit and crochet projects

Again, my thanks to Tombow for providing the Tombow Mono Adhesive Dots that I used in this project. They worked perfectly for creating my yarn swatches.