Showing posts with label pattern shop. Show all posts
Showing posts with label pattern shop. Show all posts

Crochet Pattern: Hazy Daze Hat

Stay cool this summer and block the sun with an easy crochet hat pattern.

We're expecting temperatures near 115° today in Tucson. Even I have a tough time getting excited about fiber crafts when it's this hot. But I have a super cute crocheted summer hat pattern that I think you are going to love.

The hat is made with a cool cotton, linen, silk and nettle fiber yarn. It's generously sized (22 inches in circumference) so that you can comfortably wear it with a ponytail or hairclip.

Materials

  • 1 50 g/218 yd ball of Plymouth Yarn Nettle Grove (shown in Seashell)
  • US size E (3.5 mm) crochet Hook

Gauge


6 sts or 2 rows of dc = 1 inch

Special Stitches


Cluster (CL)
- Holding back the last loop of each dc on hook, 2 dc in same st or sp, YO and draw through all 3 loops.

Beginning Cluster Shell (Beg CL Shell) - Ch 3, dc in same st or sp, ch 2, CL in same st or sp.

Cluster Shell (CL Shell) - In same st or sp work (CL, ch 2, CL). 

V-Stitch (V st) - In same st or sp work (dc, ch 2, dc).

Directions


Ch 8 and join with sl st to form a ring.

Rnd 1: Ch 3 (counts as first dc), 23 dc in ring, sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch 3. 24 dc

Rnd 2: Ch 3 (counts as first dc), dc in next dc, [ch 3, holding back the last loop of each dc on hook, dc in next 2 dc, YO and draw through all 3 loops] 11 times, ch 3, sl st in 2nd dc. 12 ch 3 sp

Rnd 3: Sl st in ch 3 sp, [ch 5, sc in next ch 3 sp] 11 times, ch 5, sl st in beginning sl st. 12 ch 5 sp

Rnd 4: 2 sl st in ch 5 sp, Beg CL Shell in same sp, [ch 3, CL Shell in next ch 5 sp] 11 times, ch 3, sl st in 1st CL. 12 CL Shell

Rnd 5: Sl st in ch 2 sp, Beg Cl Shell in same sp, [V st in ch 3 sp, Cl Shell in ch 2 sp of next Cl Shell] 11 times, V st in ch 3 sp, sl st in beginning CL.

Rnd 6: Sl st in ch 2 sp, Beg CL Shell in same sp, [ch 1, V st in ch 2 sp of next V st, ch 1, CL Shell in ch 2 sp of next CL Shell] 11 times, ch 1, V st in ch 2 sp of next V st, ch 1, sl st in beginning CL.

Rnd 7: Sl st in ch 2 sp, Beg CL Shell in same sp, [ch 2, V st in ch 2 sp of next V st, ch 2, CL Shell in ch 2 sp of next CL Shell] 11 times, ch 2, V st in ch 2 sp of next V st, ch 2, sl st in beginning CL.

Repeat Rnd 7, seven more times.

Rnd 8: Ch 3 (counts as first dc in this and all following rnds), 2 dc in ch 2 sp, dc in CL,[(2 dc in ch 2 sp, dc in dc) twice, (2 dc in ch 2 sp, dc in CL) twice] 11 times, (2 dc in ch 2 sp, dc in dc) twice, 2 dc in ch 2 sp, sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch 3. 144 dc

Rnd 9: Ch 3, dc in 10 dc, 2 dc in next dc, [dc in 11 dc, 2 dc in next dc] 11 times, sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch 3. 156 dc

Rnd 10: Ch 3, dc in 5 dc, 2 dc in next dc, [dc in 12 dc, 2 dc in next dc] 11 times, dc in 6 dc, sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch 3. 168 dc

Rnd 11: Ch 3, dc in 12 dc, 2 dc in next dc, [dc in 13 dc, 2 dc in next dc] 11 times, sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch 3. 180 dc

Rnd 12: Ch 3, dc in 6 dc, 2 dc in next dc, [dc in 14 dc, 2 dc in next dc] 11 times, dc in 7 dc, sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch 3. 192 dc

Rnd 13: Ch 1, sc in same ch as joining, ch 3, [skip 1 dc, sc in next dc, ch 3] 95 times, sl st in 1st sc, fasten off. 96 ch 3 sp

Flower

Rnd 1: Starting with a magic loop, ch 3 (counts as first dc), 15 dc in loop, tighten the magic loop, sl st in 3rd ch of beginning ch 3. 16 dc

Rnd 2: Ch 1, sc in same ch as joining, [ch 3, sc in next dc] 15 times, ch 3, sl st in 1st sc. 16 ch 3 sp

Rnd 3: Sl st in ch 3 sp, ch 1, sc in same ch 3 sp, [(hdc, dc, 2 tr, dc, hdc) in next ch 3 sp, sc in next ch 3 sp] 7 times, (hdc, dc, 2 tr, dc, hdc) in next ch 3 sp, sl st in 1st sc, fasten off.

Attach the flower to the hat and you are ready for some summer fun.

A printable version of this crocheted Hazy Daze Summer Hat pattern with additional sizing options is available in my pattern shop.






Stitch of the Month: Brick and Mortar Stitch

Learn how to knit the Brick and Mortar Stitch

This month I'd like to share a simple colorwork stitch that looks almost as cool on the wrong side as the right side.

The stitch is called the Brick and Mortar Stitch, aka Brick Stitch or Brick Wall stitch. It is worked in two colors across a multiple of 4 sts +1.



Row 1 (RS): With Color A, k all sts.
Row 2 (WS): With Color B, [sl 1, p3] to last stitch, sl 1.
Row 3: With Color B, sl 1, [k3, sl 1] across.
Row 4: With Color A, p all sts.
Row 5: With Color A, k all sts.
Row 6: With Color B, [p2, sl 1, p1] to last st, p1.
Row 7: With Color B, k1, [k1, sl1, k2] across.
Row 8: With Color A, p all sts.

Repeat Rows 1-8 for the desired length.
This is what the stitch looks like on the wrong side. There's a very subtle texture.

The "wrong side" of the knit Brick and Mortar Stitch

Ready to try a pattern incorporating the Brick and Mortar Stitch? You may enjoy "1 Sock, 2 Sock, Red Sock, Blue Sock" from my pattern shop.


Happy knitting!



Knitting Pattern: Best Worsted Socks

Stash buster sock knitting pattern: quick and easy worsted weight acrylic socks

A couple weeks ago I showed you how I tamed my tangled and unusable yarn stash. As I was sorting through my fibers I realized that I had quite a bit of leftover worsted weight acrylic. I will happily admit that I am not a yarn snob. I enjoy working with fancy fibers and indie dyed, but I have no problem using inexpensive acrylic in projects, too.

Since I have been sock obsessed for the last few months, I decided to whip up a quick pair of worsted weight acrylic socks. I think you are going to love this pattern. There's no grafting, no picked up stitches and an adult sized pair of ankle socks can easily be completed in a weekend.

Materials

  • at least 2.5 oz/70 g, 128 yd/117 m of worsted weight acrylic for ankle socks
  • US size 6 (4.25 mm) dpns
  • yarn/tapestry needle

Gauge

  • 18 sts or 24 rows = 4 inches

Sizing

  • Women's (Men's)
  • foot circumference = 7 (9) inches
  • foot length = 8 (10) inches

Abbreviations

  • CO - cast on
  • k - knit
  • p - purl
  • RS - right side
  • skpo - slip one stitch knitwise, knit one, pass slipped stitch over
  • tr st - triplet stitch
  • tw st - twin stitch
  • WS - wrong side
This pattern uses shadow wrapped short row heels. If you are unfamiliar, here's a free shadow wrapped short row heel tutorial that also includes an explanation of how to make the necessary twin and triplet stitches.

Special Stitches


1 x 1 Ribbing

All Rnds: [K1, p1] around.

Moss Stitch - worked across 16 (20) stitches

Rnd 1: [K1, p1] across.
Rnd 2: K all sts.
Rnd 3: [P1, k1] across.
Rnd 4: K all sts.

Directions


Leg

Rounds begin and end at the left-hand side of the sock. CO 32 (40).

Work 1 x 1 Ribbing for at least 1 (1 ½) inches. If you prefer a longer leg length, simply work more rnds of 1 x 1 Ribbing.

Rnd 1-4: Work Moss Stitch across 16 (20) sts, k 16 (20) sts.

Heel

The heel section is worked using the Shadow Wrapped Short Row Method, across half of the sock sts, 16 (20) sts.

Row 1 (RS): [K1, p1] 7 (9) times, k1, tw st in last st, turn.
Row 2 (WS): P 14 (18), tw st in last st, turn.
Row 3: [K1, p1] to 2 sts before tw st, k1, tw st in next st, turn.
Row 4: P to 1 st before tw st, tw st in next st, turn.

Repeat Row 3-4 until there are 5 (7) twin stitches of each side of the heel and 6 regular stitches at the center of the heel.

Row 5 (RS): [K1, p1] to first tw st, k both strands of the tw st together, tr st in next tw st, turn.
Row 6 (WS): P to first tw st, p both strands of the tw st together, tr st in next tw st, turn.
Row 7: [K1, p1] to tr st, k all strands of tr st together, tr st in next tw st, turn.
Row 8: P to tr st, p all strands of tr st together, tr st in next tw st, turn.

Repeat Row 7-8 until one tr st remains on each side of the heel.

The remainder of the sock is worked in rounds with the right side facing.

Rnd 5: [K1, p1] to tr st, k all strands of tr st together, k 16 (20).
Rnd 6: K all strands of next tr st together, k 31 (39).

Foot

All Rnds: Work Moss Stitch across 16 (20) sts, k 16 (20) sts, until sock measures 7 (8 3/8) from the back of the heel or 1 (1 5/8) inches less than desired sock length.

Toe

For Men's Size: [Skpo, k3] 8 times (32 sts remain). K all sts for 3 rnds.

For Both Sizes: The remainder of the toe is worked the same for both sizes.

[Skpo, k2] 8 times (24 sts remain). K all sts for 2 rnds.
[Skpo, k1] 8 times (16 sts remain). K all sts for 1 rnd.
[Skpo] 8 times (8 sts remain). 

Break yarn leaving a 12 inch tail. Thread yarn onto a yarn needle and pull through the remaining 8 sts to close the toe.

Stash buster sock knitting pattern: quick and easy worsted weight acrylic socks

Enjoy stash busting all of your acrylic leftovers into comfy house socks. A printable version of my Best Worsted Socks pattern (with additional sizing options) is available in my shop.

I'd love to see your finished projects. Feel free to tag me, @thechillydog, on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter with your project pictures.

Happy knitting!




Knitting Video Tutorial: Twined Colorwork Heel Flap

Twined Knitting Video Tutorial: A new twist on a traditional knit sock heel flap.

Twining is one of my very favorite colorwork techniques. I learned it quite by accident when I was first experimenting with colorwork in my knitting.

After some research, I discovered that twining is a traditional Scandinavian technique known as tvåändsstickning in Swedish and tvebandsstrikking in Norwegian. I'd like to say that this method just feels natural to me because of my Scandinavian heritage, but that's probably just in my head.

A few months ago, I made a pair of socks using twining in the round. I brought them to show the girls in my sock knitting group. On close inspection, one of the ladies commented that twining would work very well on a heel flap and that got me thinking...

I just had to design a pattern with a twined heel flap.

Here's a quick video showing how to do twining in rows.


And an upclose and personal look at both sides of the heel flap.

Twined Knitting Video Tutorial: A new twist on a traditional knit sock heel flap.

The one major difference between knitting a sock with a twined heel flap and a traditional slipped stitch ribbing heel flap has to do with how many stitches you pick up along the edges of the flap for the gusset.

Traditionally for the gusset  you pick up one stitch in each of the stitches along the side of the flap. If you do the same for a twined heel flap, the gusset will be too small. Instead, pick up approximately three stitches for every two stitches on the side of the flap.

If you are ready to try a twined heel flap, the pattern for these Road Trip Socks is available in my pattern shop.




Twined Colorwork Knitting Video Tutorial

Video Tutorial: Twined knitting is a traditional Scandinavian technique where two yarn strands are twisted around each other creating an unconventional texture.

I am pretty much a self taught knitter. Books, online tutorials and much trial and error. When I first began two-color knitting, I guess I was doing it the "wrong" way. Instead of holding one strand of yarn in my left hand and one in my right, I twisted the two strands around each other with one hand.

Little did I know that this method is actually a traditional Scandinavian technique known as twined knitting (tvåändsstickning in Swedish and tvebandsstrikking in Norwegian). I'd like to say that this method just felt natural to me because of my Scandinavian heritage, but maybe that's just in my head.

On one side of your work, twined knitting looks just like plain, old stockinette. On the other side, the twisted strands become a design element and you get a beautifully textured pattern.

To get an idea about how twined knitting works, here's a quick video so you can see the twisting and untwisting motion of the working yarn strands in action.


The complete pattern for these Spring Violet Socks is available in my pattern shop..

Happy knitting!




Knitting Pattern: November 2016 Yarnbox Infinity Scarf

Free November 2016 Yarnbox knit infinity scarf pattern featuring Jade Sapphire Exotic Fibres Re<>Luxe Lite recycled cashmere.

My best friend knows me better than just about anyone. Last year for my birthday she supported my fiber addiction and got me the November 2016 Yarnbox Classic.

I was absolutely delighted when my Yarnbox arrived and inside were two luxurious skeins of Jade Sapphire Exotic Fibres Re<>Luxe Lite recycled cashmere. It was love at first sight!

Of course I could have followed one of the patterns that were included in my yarnbox, both were lovely by the way, but I had a vision for an elegant and cozy infinity scarf. It's 7 1/2 inches wide by 55 inches long and is a treat to wear on chilly days.

Gauge


18 sts or 24 rows = 4 inches

Materials


Abbreviations


BO - bind off
CO - cast on
k - knit
k2tog - knit two stitches together
p - purl
RS - right side
skpo - slip one stitch knitwise, knit one, pass slipped stitch over
WS - wrong side
yo - yarn forward and over

Directions


CO 34.

Set-up row (WS): P34.

Row 1 (RS): K2, [k6, skpo, yo, k2tog, yo] 3 times, k2.

Row 2 and all WS rows: P 34.

Row 3: K1, [k6, skpo, yo, k2tog, yo] 3times, k3.

Row 5: [K6, skpo, yo, k2tog, yo] k6] 3 times, k4.

Row 7: K5, [skpo, yo, k2tog, yo, k6] 2 times, skpo, yo, k2tog, yo, k5.

Row 9: K4, [skpo, yo, k2tog, yo, k6] 3 times.

Row 11: K3, [skpo, yo, k2tog, yo, k6] 3 times, k1.

Row 13: K2, [skpo, yo, k2tog, yo, k6] 3 times, k2.

Row 15: K1, [skpo, yo, k2tog, yo, k6] 3 times, k3.

Row 17: K2, k2tog, yo, [k6, skpo, yo, k2tog, yo] 2 times, k6, skpo, yo, k2.

Row 19: K1, K2tog, yo, [k6, skpo, yo, k2tog, yo] 2 times, k6, skpo, yo, k3.

Row 20: P 34.

Repeat Row 1-20 until piece measures 55 inches.

BO and join cast on to bound off edges to form an infinity scarf.

Free November 2016 Yarnbox knit infinity scarf pattern featuring Jade Sapphire Exotic Fibres Re<>Luxe Lite recycled cashmere.

A printable version of my Cashmere Stripes Infinity Scarf is available in my pattern shop. Happy Knitting!




Knitting Pattern: Chemo Cap

Free knit chemo cap pattern and tips for selecting yarn
We all show our love in different ways. For me, I craft. So when my friend, Rebecca, lost her hair during chemo I offered my love and comfort with a handmade hat.

Choosing the yarn for a chemo cap is absolutely critical because skin can become very sensitive and tender during treatment. It is best to avoid wool or anything that feels skritchy. I used a viscose made from sugarcane and it is silky, soft.

Also, since they are intended for bare heads, chemo caps should be sized slightly smaller than a regular stocking cap or beanie. (You'll notice it's a little tight on me.) This cap is 18 inches in circumference and 7 1/2 inches from the cast on edge to the top.

Materials


Gauge

26 sts or 32 rows = 4 inches

Abbreviations

CO - cast on
k - knit
k2tog - knit two stitches together
p - purl

Directions

CO 132.

Rnd 1, 2, 4: [K2, p2] around.

Rnd 3: [K2tog but do not slip off left-hand needle, insert right needle between these two sts and k the first stitch again slipping both sts off the left needle together, p2] around.

Repeat Rnd 1-4 until piece measures 1 ¼ inches from cast on edge.

Rnd 5: [K9, k2tog] around. (120 sts remain)

Rnd 6 & 8: [K4, p2] around.

Rnd 7, 9, 11, 13: K all sts.

Rnd 10 & 12: [K1, p2, k3] around.

Repeat Rnds 6-13 until piece measures 5 ½ inches from cast on edge or two inches less than desired hat height.

On last rnd, place a marker every 20 sts.

[K to 2 sts before the next marker, k2tog] repeat until 6 sts remain.

Break yarn and use a yarn or tapestry needle to draw yarn through all 6 remaining sts to fasten off.

Don't you just love the swirls at the top?

Free knit chemo cap pattern and tips for selecting yarn

Warm thoughts and love to all of those who need a chemo cap. 

Free knit chemo cap pattern and tips for selecting yarn





Crochet Pattern: Pink Sands Pocket Purse

Free Crochet Pattern: Pink Sands Pocket Purse to carry just the essentials (wallet, keys, phone) when you are on the go.If you've been following along on the blog, you know that I have happily downsized my purse. It used to be called my "Big Bag of Everything" but these days I am quite pleased that it has become my "Little Bag of Necessities".

About a month ago I shared a knitting pattern for my Lifeline Pocket Purse. Today I have a crochet pattern for another micro purse. It's approximately 5 inches wide x 7 ½ inches deep and perfect for those days you want to travel light.

Many thanks to Endless Leather for providing the fantastic silk cord and jewelry findings to complete this purse.

Materials

Abbreviations 

ch - chain
sc - single crochet

Directions


This bag is worked from the bottom up, in a continuous spiral with the right side facing so there is no need to turn the piece over as you work or join the last stitch of the round to the first with a slip stitch.

Bag

Ch 30

Rnd 1: 3 sc in 2nd ch from hook, sc in next 27 ch, 2 sc in next ch, sc in the bottom of next 27 ch. (59 sc)

Rnd 2: [sc in next sc, sc in the stich below the next sc] repeat these two stitches until the piece measures 7 ½ inches from the beginning ch.

Use a ruler to find the center stitch of the bag. The center stitch should be a sc (NOT a sc in the stitch below the next sc). continue working in the pattern to 5 sts before the center mark. Your last stitch should be a sc in the stitch below the next sc.


Closure Flap

This section is worked in rows.

Row 1: [sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc] 5 times, ch 1, turn.

Repeat Row 1 until the flap measures 2 inches.

Row 2 (buttonhole row): sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc, sc in next sc, ch 4, skip 4 sts, sc in the stitch below the next sc, sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc, ch 1, turn.

Row 3: sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc, sc in next sc, 1 sc in each of the next 4 ch, sc in the stitch below the next sc, sc in next sc, sc in the stitch below the next sc.

Repeat Row 1 until the flap measures 1 inch from the button hole omitting the last ch 1 of the final row. Fasten off.

Use a needle and thread to attach a button.

Assembling the Strap

Attach the circle clasps to either side of the bag.
Cut the silk cord to the desired strap length minus ¾-inch. (If you plan to carry your purse over one shoulder, you will need 28-36 inches of cord. For a cross-body strap, plan on using 48-54 inches of cord. As shown, the silk cord was cut to 28 inches.) Be careful so the cord does not fray after it's cut.

Place a generous dot of G-S Hypo Cement into one end cup. You can even add a little glue around the tip of the silk cord.

Tip: If you don't use enough glue, the cord will slide out of the end cup the first time you use your purse.
Insert one end of the cord into the end cup. It is helpful to slightly twist the cord in the direction that it tightens as you push it into the end cup.

It's ok if some glue oozes out. Simply use a damp cloth to clean the outside of the end cup and the silk cord before the glue starts to dry.
Attach the second end cup to the other end of the cord in the same way.

LET THE GLUE DRY COMPLETELY FOR 24 HOURS.

Use pliers to open the jump rings and attach them to the looped sides of the end cups.

Open the circle clasps and slide them through the jump rings.
Fill your bag with a small wallet, phone and maybe some lip gloss and you are ready to go.

Free Crochet Pattern: Pink Sands Pocket Purse to carry just the essentials (wallet, keys, phone) when you are on the go.

A printable version of the Pink Sands Pocket Purse Pattern is available in my pattern shop. Happy crocheting!




Crochet Pattern: Dryer Balls

Free Crochet Pattern: DIY a set of wool dryer balls for softer, fresher smelling wrinkle free laundry.For years I have tried to convince my husband that there is absolutely no need to use dryer sheets. He claims that they make his clothes noticeably softer, less wrinkly and fresher smelling. I think they are a waste of money and not very eco-friendly.

Please don't leave comments that if I really wanted to be eco-friendly I would just hang my clothes outside to air dry. We live in a desert and everything that's outside for more than a minute is covered in a fine layer of dust. So, I'm doing my best here and I dug through my yarn stash to find some half used skeins of wool to make dryer balls.

In case you haven't heard of them before, folks across the interwebs claim that dryer balls can reduce the time your laundry needs in the dryer and  reduce wrinkles in your clothes. Also, if you add a few drops of your favorite essential oil to the dryer balls you can even make your laundry smell fresher. I'll let you judge for yourself if the claims are true.

I think using three dryer balls in the laundry works nicely, but you can use more or less if you like.

Materials



Abbreviations


ch - chain
sl st - slip stitch
sc - single crochet
dec - decrease by inserting the hook in the next st and draw up a loop, insert the hook in the next st and draw up a loop, yarn over and draw through all three loops

Directions


There's no need to work a gauge swatch for this project, however you will need to use a hook that is a few sizes smaller than what the yarn label recommends in order to make the top and bottom of the balls curve slightly.

Also, it doesn't really matter which side of your work is the right side because the stitches become much less noticeable after felting. The pattern is worked in continuous rounds. so no need to turn your work at the end of each round.

Ch 3, sl st in first ch to form a loop (or you can use the magic loop method), ch 1.

Rnd 1: 6 sc in loop.
Rnd 2: [2 sc in next sc] 6 times. (12 sts)
Rnd 3: [2 sc in next sc, sc in next sc] 6 times. (18 sts)
Rnd 4: [2 sc in next sc, sc in next 2 sc] 6 times. (24 sts)
Rnd 5: [2 sc in next sc, sc in next 3 sc] 6 times. (30 sts)

If your work isn't slightly curved, you'll need to try again with a smaller crochet hook.
Rnd 6-11: sc in each sc around. (30 sc per round for 6 rounds is 180 sc total)
Roll a tight ball of wool yarn to fill your work.

Pro Tip: If you are making multiple dryer balls, it's helpful to use a food scale to measure the weight of the rolled yarn balls to make sure they are all the same size.
Place the rolled yarn ball into your work.

Rnd 12: [dec, sc in next 3 sc] 6 times. (24 sts)
Rnd 13: [dec, sc in next 2 sc] 6 times. (18 sts)
Rnd 14: [dec, sc in next sc] 6 times. (12 sts)
Rnd 15: [dec] until no more sts can be worked.
Fasten off and pull the yarn tail into the ball.
Next, you will machine felt your dryer balls. This makes them fuzzier and more dense.

Machine wash and dry your dryer balls 3-5 times with the rest of your laundry. Don't use any fabric softener in the laundry when you are felting.
Your dryer balls will get smaller and smaller each time you wash and dry them.

After you have competed the felting process, you do not need to wash your dryer balls again.
If you want them to smell extra nice, add 3-5 drops of your favorite essential oil to each ball. I like jasmine best. Let the oil soak in over night. You can add a few more drops of oil any time the dryer balls start to lose their scent.

Now, just toss in your dryer balls when you are drying clean laundry for fluffier, fresher smelling laundry with less wrinkles. At least that's what my skeptical hubby believes. ;)

Free Crochet Pattern: DIY a set of wool dryer balls for softer, fresher smelling wrinkle free laundry.




Knitting Pattern: Lifeline Pocket Purse

Free Knitting Pattern: Lifeline Pocket Purse to carry just the essentials (phone, wallet, keys) when you are on the go.I'm a mom and for 17 years my family called my purse the "Big Bag of Everything". I was like Mary Poppins. If you needed a tissue, it was in my purse. Need a pen? In my purse. Bandage, ibuprofen, reusable shopping bag, nail file, eye drops, lip balm. They were all in my purse and there was still ample room to hold everyone else's stuff, too.

Now that the nest is empty, I can finally downsize my "Big Bag of Everything" to a much more convenient "Little Bag of Necessities". It is so nice to carry just what I need instead of what the whole world needs.

With that in mind I designed this pattern to hold just the basics when you are on the go. It's approximately 4 3/8 inches wide x 6 ½ inches deep.

Many thanks to Endless Leather for providing the fantastic silk cord and jewelry findings to complete this purse. Also, thanks to my Facebook followers for helping me name this pattern.

Materials


Abbreviations

CO - cast on
k - knit
p - purl
RS - right side
WS - wrong side
ssk - slip two stitches individually knitwise, then knit the two stitches together through the back loops
k2tog - knit 2 stitches together

Shingle Stitch Chart


Shingle Stitch Knitting Chart

Directions


Bag

The bag is worked in the round with the right side facing.

CO 80 across 4 dpns or short circular needles leaving a long (approx. 24 inch) tail.

Work the Shingle Stitch in rounds, following the chart, until the piece measures 6 ½ inches from the cast on edge, ending after either Rnd 6 or Rnd 12.

Bind off 40 sts.

Flap

The flap of the purse is worked flat over 30 rows following the stitch chart. Make sure to read your work as you decrease the sides of the flap to maintain the pattern.

Rows 1-4: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (40 sts)
Row 5: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (38 sts)
Rows 6-9: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (38 sts)
Row 10: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (36 sts)
Rows 11-13: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (36 sts)
Row 14: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (34 sts)
Rows 15-17: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (34 sts)
Row 18 (Button Hole Row): Ssk, work pattern as charted for 13 sts, bind off 4 sts, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (14 sts, buttonhole gap, 14 sts)
Row 19: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern for 14 sts, co 4 sts, continue maintaining the charted stitch pattern for 14 sts. (32 sts)
Row 20: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (32 sts)
Row 21: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (30 sts)
Rows 22-23: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (30 sts)
Row 24: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (28 sts)
Row 25: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (28 sts)
Row 26: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (26 sts)
Row 27: Work piece even maintaining the charted stitch pattern. (26 sts)
Rows 28-30: Ssk, work pattern as charted to last 2 sts, k2tog. (Rnd 28: 24 sts, Rnd 29: 22 sts, Rnd 30: 20 sts)

Bind off.

Join the bottom of the cast on edge with the yarn tail using a tapestry needle.
Position the button and stitch it on using a needle and thread.
Assembling the Strap


Attach the circle clasps to either side of the bag about 6 rows down from the bound off edge.
Cut the silk cord to the desired strap length minus ¾-inch. (If you plan to carry your purse over one shoulder, you will need 28-36 inches of cord. For a cross-body strap, plan on using 48-54 inches of cord. As shown, the silk cord was cut to 28 inches.) Be careful so the cord does not fray after it's cut.

Place a generous dot of G-S Hypo Cement into one end cup. You can even add a little glue around the tip of the silk cord.

Tip: If you don't use enough glue, the cord will slide out of the end cup the first time you use your purse.
Insert one end of the cord into the end cup. It is helpful to slightly twist the cord in the direction that it tightens as you push it into the end cup.

It's ok if some glue oozes out. Simply use a damp cloth to clean the outside of the end cup and the silk cord before the glue starts to dry.
Attach the second end cup to the other end of the cord in the same way.

LET THE GLUE DRY COMPLETELY FOR 24 HOURS.

Use pliers to open the jump rings and attach them to the looped sides of the end cups.
Open the circle clasps and slide them through the jump rings.
Fill your bag with a small wallet, phone and maybe some lip gloss and you are ready to go.

Free Knitting Pattern: Lifeline Pocket Purse to carry just the essentials (phone, wallet, keys) when you are on the go.

A printable version of my Lifeline Pocket Purse Pattern is available in my pattern shop. Happy Knitting!