Showing posts with label tutorial. Show all posts
Showing posts with label tutorial. Show all posts

Sewing Pattern: Small Project Bag for Knitters

Free Sewing Pattern: Small travel bag for your knit and crochet projects.

At the beginning of the year I started attending a monthly sock knitting group at my local yarn store. It is so refreshing to chat with other knitters, see their projects and share tips and ideas. Of course having a small project bag dedicated to my sock club projects is handy, so I raided my fabric stash to stitch up a cheery tote.

Materials


  • 1/3 yd each of 2 coordinating fabrics (one for the bag and one for the lining)
  • Dritz 1/4" eyelets with setting tool
  • hammer
  • 1 x 2 inch piece of fusible interfacing
  • iron
  • 2/3 yd of 1/8-inch elastic cord
  • Dritz cord stop
  • compass, paper, pencil
  • sewing, measuring and cutting supplies

Directions


Before you start cutting your fabric, you'll need to draw a template for the bottom piece of the bag. Using a compass, draw a circle with a 3 3/8 inch radius on a piece of paper and cut out the circle.

Cut a rectangle that's 19 1/16 inches wide x 11 3/4 inches tall from both the outer and lining fabrics. Use your circle template to cut a circle from both the outer and lining fabrics.
Before sewing, the eyelets need to be attached to the outer bag fabric. Fold the outer fabric in half width-wise and finger press the center line.
Using a fabric marking pen or pencil make a mark 1 3/4 inches below the top edge of the fabric and 1/2 inch to either side of the center line.
Attach a piece of fusible interfacing on the wrong side of the outer fabric behind the eyelet marks according to the manufacturer's instructions.
With scissors or a hammer and the eyelet tool, cut/punch 1/4 inch holes centered over your marks.

(Note: As I was writing this post I discovered that my style of eyelet tool is fairly old and may not be available anymore. Some of the newer tools only secure the eyelets and can not be used for making the hole.)
Insert the eyelets into the holes from front to back.
Use a hammer and the other end of the eyelet tool to flatten and secure the eyelets.
Fold the top edge of both the outer and lining fabrics over 1/2 inch and press with an iron.
Now it's time to sew. First assemble the outer portion of the bag, then repeat the same process for the lining.

Unfold the top edge of the bag. Fold the bag in half width-wise, right sides together and stitch the side using a 1/2 inch seam allowance.
Attaching the round bag bottom can be a little intimidating so it is helpful to make some temporary guidelines to help with the placement.
Fold the bottom piece in half and finger press the center line.
Fold the piece in half again and finger press the center line.
Unfold the circle and you can see the quadrants nicely marked.
Next, finger press the fold opposite the seam on the side of the bag.
Fold again so that your finger pressed line is even with your stitches and finger press.
Now the bottom of the bag is also divided into quadrants.
With right sides together, align the quadrant lines of the circular bottom with the quadrant lines on the bag and pin in place.
Carefully align the edges and pin around the remainder of the bag bottom.

Stitch around the bag bottom using a 1/2 inch seam allowance.
Turn the outer bag right side out. The lining can remain wrong side out. Make sure the top edges are folded down.
Insert the lining into the bag. With wrong sides together, align the side seams of the outer and lining fabric. Pin around the top edge of the bag.
Stitch around the top of the bag 1/8 inch from the edge.
Create a channel for the drawstring by stitching around the top of the bag approximately 1/4 inch above and below the eyelet edges.

Pull the cord through the channel and secure with a cord stop.
And finally, the very best part, fill your bag with yarn, your latest project and your favorite knitting necessities like a Clover quick locking stitch marker set and a cute tape measure (mine is from All About the Buttons).

Free Sewing Pattern: Small travel bag for your knit and crochet projects.




Knitting Video Tutorial: Twined Colorwork Heel Flap

Twined Knitting Video Tutorial: A new twist on a traditional knit sock heel flap.

Twining is one of my very favorite colorwork techniques. I learned it quite by accident when I was first experimenting with colorwork in my knitting.

After some research, I discovered that twining is a traditional Scandinavian technique known as tvåändsstickning in Swedish and tvebandsstrikking in Norwegian. I'd like to say that this method just feels natural to me because of my Scandinavian heritage, but that's probably just in my head.

A few months ago, I made a pair of socks using twining in the round. I brought them to show the girls in my sock knitting group. On close inspection, one of the ladies commented that twining would work very well on a heel flap and that got me thinking...

I just had to design a pattern with a twined heel flap.

Here's a quick video showing how to do twining in rows.


And an upclose and personal look at both sides of the heel flap.

Twined Knitting Video Tutorial: A new twist on a traditional knit sock heel flap.

The one major difference between knitting a sock with a twined heel flap and a traditional slipped stitch ribbing heel flap has to do with how many stitches you pick up along the edges of the flap for the gusset.

Traditionally for the gusset  you pick up one stitch in each of the stitches along the side of the flap. If you do the same for a twined heel flap, the gusset will be too small. Instead, pick up approximately three stitches for every two stitches on the side of the flap.

If you are ready to try a twined heel flap, the pattern for these Road Trip Socks is available in my Craftsy Shop.




Craft Tutorial: Irish Euro Shamrock Pendant

Transform a foreign coin and shamrock into a keepsake necklace

Ireland is a lovely country. We visited back in 2005 and had a delightful time. The people are friendly, the countryside is green (a stark contrast to life here in the desert), the food was savory, there are plenty of castles and historical attractions, and the woodlands are magical.

After our trip, I had a couple Euros left in my pocket. I didn't really think about them much until this year. Somehow, even though we live in the middle of the Sonoran Desert, I have a large patch of shamrocks that have taken over one of my flower beds. It seemed to me that my Irish Euros would be the perfect background for a shamrock pendant.

Materials




Directions


The first step is to collect and press some small shamrocks. If you are not lucky enough to have a shamrock patch, many nurseries carry indoor shamrock plants in the spring.

The pressing and drying process can take anywhere from a few days to a couple weeks.
Once your shamrocks are ready, tear off a piece of packing tape that is long enoug to wrap around the edge of your coin about 1 1/2 times.

Cut a strip of tape about 1/2 inch wide.
Wrap the tape tightly around the coin. You can fold down a small edge of the tape so it is easier to remove later.
Make sure to press the tape firmly down around the edge of the coin.

The tape makes a sort of bezel that can be filled with resin.
Tiny dried shamrocks are very delicate. Tap a cotton swab on your tongue then use the swab to lift your shamrock.
Place the shamrock onto the center of the coin.
Use a toothpick to slide the shamrock into position if necessary.

Make sure your coins are on a protected work surface before you begin using the resin. I like using parchment paper to cover my surface, although a plastic plate will also work.
Mix the resin in a disposable cup according to the package directions. Stir the resin gently to minimize the formation of bubbles.

Resin is very sticky, messy and hard to clean up so again, make sure your work surface is protected.
Carefully pour the resin onto your tape-wrapped coins.
The resin should be approximately the same thickness as the coin.
After about 20-40 minutes you may see that your shamrock has floated to the surface of the resin. If this happens, carefully use a toothpick to gently submerge the shamrock halfway between the coin and the resin surface.
Now the hard part. Do not move or touch your resin covered coins for 24 hours. The shiny resin surface is irresistible but keep your hands off.

After 24 hours, remove the tape from the coin.
You will notice that the resin is very smooth across the center of the coin, but there is a ridge along the edge.

Use a scissors (at about a 45° angle to the resin) to trim away the excess resin.

Don't worry if it looks a little uneven at this point.
Use a piece of very fine grit wet/dry sandpaper to smooth out the edge of the resin by holding the coin at a 45° angle to the paper and rubbing the resin on the paper.

This process takes a little time and patience, but is well worth the effort.
The coin on the left has been sanded, the coin on the right has not.

There is still a slight lip around the edge of the resin, but we’re going to call that a design element.
Once you have smoothed down the resin edges, it's time to attach the bail to the back of the coin with G-S Hypo Cement.

Again, work on a parchment covered surface.
Fill the depression of the bail with G-S Hypo Cement and wait for about 15-30 seconds. Position the coin onto the bail.

And then, the hard part, again. Do not move or touch the pendant for 24 hours while the glue cures completely.
Once the glue has dried, simply slide a chain or cord through the bail and your necklace is ready to wear.

Transform a foreign coin and shamrock into a keepsake pendant

Happy St. Patrick's Day!