Showing posts with label wood. Show all posts
Showing posts with label wood. Show all posts

Clothespin Christmas Card Holder

How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly DogMy name is Ellen, and I collect Christmas cards. I haven't thrown one away in more years than I care to admit. Strange, but true. I have always wanted to display my collection as it grows in December, but never really had a way to do that, until now.

This year I decided to make a card holder that I can hang on the wall to show off my new treasures. Clothespins seemed like a necessary material for this easy DIY project, but I think you'll be surprised at some of the other materials!

Materials


  • 18 - wooden clothespins
  • 1/8 inch wooden dowel
  • 19 - 5/8 inch diameter wooden beads
  • sawtooth picture hanger
  • hammer
  • RIT liquid fabric dye in kelly green
  • RIT liquid fabric dye in fuchsia
  • silicon adhesive
  • wire cutter or heavy duty scissors

Directions


When I was planning this project, I was stumped about how to get my clothespins and wooden beads in the colors I wanted. I thought about painting them, but it seemed like a lot of work and I wasn't sure I would be able to get the colors evenly applied. So, I took a rather unconventional approach and used fabric dye instead.

Use RIT dye to color wooden clothespins | The Chilly Dog To dye the clothespins, bring 3 cups of water to a boil. Add 1/2 cup of the liquid RIT dye in kelly green. Stir it up and let your clothespins soak in the mixture for 30-45 minutes, stirring occasionally. (The longer they soak, the darker they will be.)
Use RIT dye to color wooden beads | The Chilly Dog To dye the wooden beads, bring 1 cup of water to a boil. Add 1/4 cup of the liquid RIT dye in fuchsia. Stir it up and let the beads soak for 30-45 minutes.
Use RIT dye to color wooden pieces Rinse the clothespins and beads with cool water until the water runs clear. Place the pieces on a wire cooling rack to dry overnight.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Once all the pieces are completely dry, you can construct the card holder.

Begin by attaching the sawtooth picture hanger to one of the clothespins.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Make sure that the center of the sawtooth lines up with the center of the spring in the clothes pin.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Apply a bit of silicon adhesive to the end of the dowel.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Slide a bead down to the end of the dowel.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Twist the bead around a bit so it gets filled up with the adhesive.

Let the glue dry. (This is the step I always have a problem with because I am impatient.)

In case you are like me, I will repeat that last step. Let the glue dry.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Once the glue is dry alternate sliding a clothespin then a bead on the dowel. I also alternated which direction the clothespins were facing.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Once your cardholder is the desired length, slide the clothespin with the sawtooth picture hanger onto the dowel.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Use a wire cutter or heavy duty scissors to trim the dowel about 1/2 inch past the last clothespin.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Apply a generous amount of silicon adhesive to the end of the dowel.
How to make a red and green, wooden clothespin Christmas card holder | The Chilly Dog Slide the last bead onto the dowel and make sure it is filled with the adhesive.

Let the glue dry completely before you move your cardholder.

Once the glue is dry, hang up your card holder and start collecting your greetings.


Happy Holidays!



Fire Pit Season: Fire Starters

Create some “Wow” right now with a quick and easy project that can be crafted in 20 minutes or less!


How to make camp fire starters with a toilet paper tube, dryer lint and newspaper | The Chilly Dog
Now that we have comfy, new cushions on the benches by our fire pit, we're just about ready to start toasting some marshmallows and making s'mores. Yummy!

You don't have to be a boy scout to start a campfire. A friend of mine told me about a nifty way to start a fire using dryer lint and a toilet paper tube. This project is far from glamorous, but it is an incredibly effective way to get your campfire started.

Materials


  • toilet paper tubes
  • newspaper
  • dryer lint


Directions


Don't laugh, but this time of year I have a two little bags in the laundry room. One is filled with toilet paper tubes and the other, dryer lint. I like to make a bunch of these so they are ready to go whenever we're in the mood to relax by the fire pit.


How to make camp fire starters with a toilet paper tube, dryer lint and newspaper | The Chilly Dog Tear a newspaper page in half at the fold. Roll the paper widthwise and insert it into the toilet paper tube.
How to make camp fire starters with a toilet paper tube, dryer lint and newspaper | The Chilly Dog Push the dryer lint into the tube until the it is filled tightly. You may need a stick or skewer to push the lint into the tube.
How to make camp fire starters with a toilet paper tube, dryer lint and newspaper | The Chilly Dog Gently twist each end of the paper and slightly push them into the tube.

It's just that easy! Grab your graham crackers, Hershey bars, and marshmallows. All you need to do is place two or three of your fire starters under your logs and  light them up. Your family will be enjoying the warm glow and tasty treats before you know it!

How to make camp fire starters with a toilet paper tube, dryer lint and newspaper | The Chilly Dog




My Fairy Village

Welcome to my fairy village on the first day of autumn!

There are five houses in the village along with tiny cement stepping stones, a wooden stairway up one of the steep slopes, a reflecting pool, glowing flowers and even solar path lighting.

I can see the village through the sliding glass doors in our living room. As crazy as it sounds, I pause briefly whenever I pass them to see if there's any activity in the village. So far all I have seen are some lizards that like to visit the village during the day.

Join me for a 3 minute video tour of the village:




Or take the walking tour:


The lower village is home to the glass houses as well as the solar light charging station. Growing in the lower village, a Rudolph Euphorbia, Royal Pinwheel and some Silver Mist Helichrysum.



If you feel adventurous, climb the green stairway to the upper levels of the village.


The paint can luminaria house is centrally located and has a Breathless Blush Euphorbia in the back yard as well as a Dragon's Blood Sedum in the front.


A short trip through a narrow crevice leads to the next house.


The log house is nestled behind the Angel Hair Artemisia just past the Zebra Plant in the mini desert.


Be careful as you travel to the next house. It lies just beyond the main village's lighting system.


The shell cottage is located in the upper level of the village overlooking a deep blue reflecting pool.


 Whenever you need a little magical adventure, stop by for a visit and see if you can spot the fairies.




Fairy House - Rustic Log

It may seem kind of silly to some, but I am on a quest to create a fairy village in a rocky flower bed in our back yard. It all started because of a picture I saw on Pinterest. Someone had made a quaint fairy village that looked like a miniature version of something you might see in the English countryside.

Stylistically, my village is a little different. So far I have constructed houses from a clay pot, a paint can and a Baileys Irish Cream Bottle. My next house is a bit more rustic. It's made from a log.


Materials


  • 4 clear glass gems
  • glow in the dark paint
  • fairy wish door (made by Darice)
  • wire cutters
  • large branch or log
  • saw
  • drill with 1/2 inch boring bit
  • silicon adhesive
  • reindeer moss

Directions


Before you head out to find a branch or log, you can prepare the windows and door of your house.

Place a drop or two of glow in the dark paint on the flat side of your glass gems. Let the paint dry completely.




The fairy wish doors are actually lockets. I found mine at Jo-Ann in the beading and jewelry making section.







For my purposes, I don't need the door to be a necklace, so I used a pair of wire cutters to snip off the loop above the door.







Did I mention that the doors really open. How fun is that?

Once the windows and doors are ready, you can go find the perfect branch or log for your fairy house.





We have a lovely fire pit in the backyard. We don't use it much this time of year so I grabbed one of our fire pit logs for my project. I found one that was nice and barky on one side.






The log was a little to large for the house I was envisioning, so I got out the hand saw and sliced off a piece that is about 5-6 inches high. (That was my workout for the day!)






Use a 1/2 inch boring bit to drill four window openings, about 1/4 inch deep, into the bark so the windows look like they were are set into the log, not just glued to it.






Once the paint on your glass gems is completely dry, use silicon adhesive to glue them into the window openings.







Use the silicon adhesive to glue some reindeer moss on the roof to give the house that lived in look.

You can find reindeer moss or other types of dried moss in the floral section at the craft store.




Finally, attach the door with some silicon adhesive.

Once all the glue has dried, you can place your fairy house in the garden and wait for some magical little guests to move in.






Decoupage Key Hooks

The reality in our home right now is that in less than two months we will have a third licensed driver in the house and a third car in the driveway. Aagh... I know it's going to be okay, but I am having a difficult time with this transition. It seems like yesterday when my baby was still, well, a baby.

I decided that I would try to embrace this change with a project. More cars means more keys, so I am going to try to be organized with some key hooks. We have an area in our kitchen where phones, bills, checkbooks and what not all collect, so it seemed that would be a perfect place for the keys, too.

Materials


  • 4 wood plaques
  • white paint (acrylic or latex)
  • 1 or 2 paint brushes
  • 1 piece of scrapbook paper
  • paper cutter, paper punches or die cut machine
  • Mod Podge
  • decoupage gloss sealer (optional)
  • drill
  • 4 cup hooks
  • 4 small sawtooth hangers
  • hammer
  • needle nosed pliers (optional)
  • poster tack (optional)
  • 4 small nails

Directions


Begin with your four plaques. You can get these at your local craft or hobby store. I chose square ones, but they come in a variety of shapes.








Paint each plaque. Let the paint dry. If you need to, apply a second coat of paint.









Cut out the paper shapes you would like to apply on your plaques. I used my Silhouette Cameo Starter Kit Bundle Cutter but you can use another type of die cut machine or even shape punches or scissors.

If you use a Silhouette, these shapes are from a set is called "basic icons 2" and you can purchase it on the Silhouette America web site.




Now it's time to decoupage.

Place one of your die cuts on a painted plaque and position it the way you like. Use a paintbrush to apply a generous coat of Mod Podge over the top of your paper shape.

If you are unfamiliar with Mod Podge, it's like a really liquidy glue that dries clear. It will soak into your paper and adhere it to the wooden surface.




Use the Mod Podge to attach your die cuts to each plaque. Let the Mod Podge dry.









I like to spray on a coat of decoupage glass sealer to make my projects more durable, but it's your preference. Let the sealer dry.

Mark where you will be placing the hooks on each plaque. I chose to put mine in the center.








Drill holes where the hooks will be inserted. You don't have to drill all the way through the wood, just enough to get the hooks started.

Don't screw in the hooks quite yet.






On the back of each plaque you will need to attach the sawtooth hangers. Make sure they are positioned in the same location on each plaque.

Protect your fingers. You may want to use a needle nosed pliers to hold the tiny nails while you hammer.





Once the hangers are on, turn the plaques over and attach the cup hooks.









Your key hooks are ready to hang on the wall.

Since the keys will be placed on the hooks and taken off again, I stuck a little ball of poster tack on the back of each plaque so it wouldn't be jostled around.





Finally, add your keys for some pretty and practical home organization.